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Feb 20-24

date 02/17/2017 author Debbie Barkela category Uncategorized comment Leave a comment

Ag 1-
Lesson 4.1 – Starting from the Ground Up
 
Preface
Plants and animals are dependent upon their environments for survival. Soil provides substance to anchor plant roots and aids in retaining air, water, and nutrients plants use for growth. Animals rely on the soil to produce plants for food and shelter.
 
To understand the nature of soil, background knowledge of how soils are formed is important. Several factors transform rock and other parent material into soil particles. Over time, collections of soil particles comprise layers of soil called horizons. Soil horizons each have unique characteristics that affect soil use for plant growth.
 
The physical weathering process of rocks that make soil particles and form soil horizons can also be harmful for crop production. Soil erosion is the result of the natural weathering process and results in removing valuable top soil. Erosion is viewed as a process which degrades the soil quality.
 
This lesson examines the forces applied to the earth’s surface that are responsible for soil formation. It will also identify the components that make up soil and define the components that contribute to plant growth.
 
Concepts
1.    Mineral matter, air, water, and organic matter are found in different proportions within a soil and define soil quality.
2.    Mineral soils consist of three different particle sizes, specifically sand, silt, and clay.
3.    Geographical features and environmental factors influence the formation process of soils and impact soil quality.
4.    Soil erosion results in the loss of quality top soil and is a concern in the study of mineral soils.
 
Performance Objectives
It is expected that students will
·         Conduct a sediment test to determine the particle sizes of the mineral matter and the presence of organic matter in a sample of soil.
·         Investigate the effects organic matter has on soil porosity and soil air holding capacity.
·         Conduct an investigation of soil deposition caused by water.
 
Standards and Benchmarks Addressed
AFNR Career Cluster – LifeKnowledge® and Cluster Skills Content Standards
Lesson 4.1 will address parts of the following performance elements:
 
CS.11. Performance Element: Scientific Inquiry: Utilize scientific inquiry as an investigative method.
 
AFNR Career Cluster – Natural Resources Systems Career Pathway Content Standards
Lesson 4.1 will address parts of the following performance elements:
 
NRS.01. Performance Element: Explain interrelationships between natural resources and humans necessary to conduct management activities in natural environments.
NRS.02. Performance Element: Apply scientific principles to natural resource management activities.
 
AFNR Career Cluster – Plant Systems Career Pathway Content Standards
Lesson 4.1 will address parts of the following performance elements:
 
PS.02. Performance Element: Prepare and implement a plant management plan that addresses the influence of environmental factors, nutrients, and soil on plant growth.
 
National Science Education Standards
Unifying Concepts and Processes: As a result of activities in grades K-12, all students should develop understanding and abilities aligned with the following concepts and processes:
·         Systems, order, and organization
·         Constancy, change, and measurement
·         Form and function
Physical Science – Content Standard B: As a result of their activities in grades 9-12, all students should develop understanding of
·         Structure and properties of matter
Science in Personal and Social Perspectives – Content Standard F: As a result of their activities in grades 9-12, all students should develop understanding of
·         Natural and human-induced hazards
 
Principles and Standards for School Mathematics

Measurement Instructional programs from pre-kindergarten through grade 12 should enable all students to apply appropriate techniques, tools, and formulas to determine measurements.
 
Standards for the English Language Arts
Standard 12 Students use spoken, written and visual language to accomplish their own purposes (e.g. for learning, enjoyment, persuasion, and the exchange of information).
 
Essential Questions
1.    What is soil?
2.    How are soils formed?
3.    What is in soil?
4.    How are different colors of soil created?
5.    What is parent material?
6.    How old are soils?
7.    What is a mineral soil?
8.    How do sand, silt, and clay differ?
9.    What influences the formation of soil?
10. What is a soil profile?
11. What is important to know about soil layers?
12. What is soil erosion and why is it important to understand?
 
Key Terms
Accumulation Arthropod Bacteria
Bedrock Clay Climate
Deposition Erosion Fungi
Gravel Ground cover Horizon
Irrigation Leaching Microorganism
Mineral Mineral soil Mottle
Nematodes Organic matter Organism
Parent material Porosity Profile (Soil)
Rock Sand Silt
Soil Soil texture Topography
Transformation Translocation Valley
Weathering    
 
Day-to-Day Plans
Time: 4 days
The teacher will refer to the Teacher Resources section for specific information on teaching this lesson; in particular Lesson 4.1 Teacher Notes, Lesson 4.1 Glossary, Lesson 4.1 Equipment and Supplies, and other support materials.
Day 1:
·         The teacher will present Concepts, Performance Objectives, Key Terms, and Essential Questions in order to provide a lesson overview.
·         The teacher will provide students with a copy of Activity 4.1.1 Separating the Pieces.
·         Students will work in pairs to complete Part One of Activity 4.1.1 Separating the Pieces and set it aside for later.
·         The teacher will provide students Presentation Notes pages to be used throughout the presentation to record notes and reflections. These pages are to be added to the Agriscience Notebook.
·         The teacher will present PowerPoint® What’s in Soil?
·         Students will take notes using the Presentation Notes pages provided by the teacher.
Day 2:
·         The teacher will provide students with Activity 4.1.2 Extracting Air.
·         Students will work in pairs to complete Activity 4.1.2 Extracting Air.
·         Students will work in pairs to complete Part Two of Activity 4.1.1 Separating the Pieces by examining the soil profile tubes and completing the Conclusion questions.
Day 3:
·         The teacher will present PowerPoint® How Soils are Formed.
·         Students will take notes using the Presentation Notes pages provided by the teacher.
·         The teacher will provide students a copy of Activity 4.1.3 Moving the Earth.
·         Students will work in groups of four to complete Activity 4.1.3 Moving the Earth and submit the worksheet for grading.
Day 4:
·         The teacher will lead students in a summary discussion of the activities to verify students understand concepts of the lesson.
·         The teacher will distribute Lesson 4.1 Check for Understanding.
·         Students will complete Lesson 4.1 Check for Understanding and submit for grading.
·         The teacher will assess student work using Lesson 4.1 Check for Understanding Answer Key.
 

Ag 2-
Lesson 4.3 Breathing, Beating, and Body Controls
 
Preface
While Lesson 4.2 Putting the Puzzle Together focused on the anatomy of animals, this and the following lesson focus on the physiology of the parts studied in anatomy. Physiology is the study of the function of plant and animal bodies, systems, organs, tissues, and cells. Not all physiology lessons occur within this unit, digestive and reproductive physiology lessons are within their respective units of study. The respiratory and circulatory systems are two of the most basic systems of life. Without the flow of blood and intake of oxygen, mammals and other vertebrates cannot survive for long. The functions of the respiratory and circulatory systems are closely related in the body. Other body systems that are closely and tied to these are the nervous, renal, and endocrine systems.
 
The respiratory system exchanges oxygen from the air with carbon dioxide, the product of respiration, to maintain a balance in the body. Breathing brings air from the atmosphere into the lungs where it is delivered to the blood and exchanged for carbon dioxide to be expelled back into the atmosphere. Blood serves as a carrier of oxygen (O2) and carbon dioxide (CO2) from cells to the lungs.
 
The circulatory system works closely with the respiratory system, moving oxygen and carbon dioxide to and from the lungs. The major function of the circulatory system is to serve as a mechanism to deliver raw materials and remove wastes in the cells. The heart, the major organ of the circulatory system, serves as a pump for blood. It cycles blood from the veins to the lungs where oxygen levels are replenished, back to the heart, and out to other organs in the body.
 
The nervous system is like a mission control center, constantly collecting internal and external information throughout the body and transmitting appropriate bodily responses. The endocrine system is comprised of many glands that secrete chemical messages to organs within the body. These messages aid in maintaining homeostasis and regulating the growth, development, and metabolism of animals. Hormones act on target organs to produce a desired result. The renal or urinary system is the waste management system of cells. The renal system filters wastes produced in the cells out of blood and excretes it from the body. All of these systems work in harmony to maintain the essential processes needed to sustain life.
 
In this lesson, students will explore respiration and heart rate under various conditions. Students will also study the relationships of the nervous, renal, and endocrine systems as well as their connection to the respiratory and circulatory systems. Conducting these studies on animals is challenging, so students will test respiration and heart rate on themselves, but should realize many domestic animal systems are quite similar to their own. Students will design a concept map to depict the processes that occur in the body and how they are connected.
 
Concepts Performance Objectives
Students will know and understand Students will learn concepts by doing
1. The respiratory and circulatory systems are closely related and essential for animal life. ·  Identify and explain the function of the parts of the respiratory and circulatory systems. (Activity 4.3.1)
2. External respiration is a process of gas exchanges between the lungs and blood. ·  Describe the process of gas exchange in external respiration. (Activity 4.3.2)
·  Determine the presence of carbon dioxide in exhaled air. (Activity 4.3.2)
3. The circulatory system relies on the heart to pump blood throughout the body. ·  Design a travel brochure that highlights the flow of blood throughout the body. (Project 4.3.3)
4. Respiration and heart rates may be affected by external conditions, such as temperature and physical activity. ·  Conduct an inquiry on the effects of external conditions on respiration rate, pulse, and blood pressure. (Activity 4.3.4)
5. The nervous, endocrine, and renal systems work together to transmit signals, secrete hormones, and filter wastes. ·  Map the functions of body systems, specifically the nervous, endocrine, and renal systems in order to demonstrate their connection to each other and other systems in the body. (Project 4.3.5)
 
 
National AFNR Career Cluster Content Standards Alignment
AFNR: LifeKnowledge® and Cluster Skills Content Standards
CS.04. Systems: Examine roles within teams, work units, departments, organizations, inter-organizational systems, and the larger environment.
CS.11. Scientific Inquiry: Utilize scientific inquiry as an investigative method.
 
AFNR: Animal Systems Career Pathway Content Standards
AS.02. Classify, evaluate, select, and manage animals based on anatomical and physiological characteristics.
 
 
Next Generation Science Standards Alignment
Disciplinary Core Ideas
Life Science
LS1: From Molecules to Organisms: Structures and Processes
LS1.A: Structure and Function ·  Systems of specialized cells within organisms help them perform the essential functions of life.
·  Multicellular organisms have a hierarchical structural organization, in which any one system is made up of numerous parts and is itself a component of the next level.
·  Feedback mechanisms maintain a living system’s internal conditions within certain limits and mediate behaviors, allowing it to remain alive and functional even as external conditions change within some range. Feedback mechanisms can encourage (through positive feedback) or discourage (negative feedback) what is going on inside the living system.
 
Science and Engineering Practices
Asking Questions and Defining Problems Asking questions and defining problems in 9–12 builds on K–8 experiences and progresses to formulating, refining, and evaluating empirically testable questions and design problems using models and simulations.
·  Ask questions that arise from careful observation of phenomena, or unexpected results
?      to clarify and/or seek additional information.
?      to determine relationships, including quantitative relationships, between independent and dependent variables.
·  Evaluate a question to determine if it is testable and relevant.
·  Ask questions that can be investigated within the scope of the school laboratory, research facilities, or field (e.g., outdoor environment) with available resources and, when appropriate, frame a hypothesis based on a model or theory.
·  Define a design problem that involves the development of a process or system with interacting components and criteria and constraints that may include social, technical and/or environmental considerations.
Planning and Carrying Out Investigations Planning and carrying out investigations in 9-12 builds on K-8 experiences and progresses to include investigations that provide evidence for and test conceptual, mathematical, physical, and empirical models.
·  Plan an investigation or test a design individually and collaboratively to produce data to serve as the basis for evidence as part of building and revising models, supporting explanations for phenomena, or testing solutions to problems. Consider possible confounding variables or effects and evaluate the investigation’s design to ensure variables are controlled.
·  Plan and conduct an investigation individually and collaboratively to produce data to serve as the basis for evidence, and in the design: decide on types, how much, and accuracy of data needed to produce reliable measurements and consider limitations on the precision of the data (e.g., number of trials, cost, risk, time), and refine the design accordingly.
·  Plan and conduct an investigation or test a design solution in a safe and ethical manner including considerations of environmental, social, and personal impacts.
·  Select appropriate tools to collect, record, analyze, and evaluate data.
·  Make directional hypotheses that specify what happens to a dependent variable when an independent variable is manipulated.
Obtaining, Evaluating, and Communicating Information Obtaining, evaluating, and communicating information in 9–12 builds on K–8 experiences and progresses to evaluating the validity and reliability of the claims, methods, and designs.
·  Critically read scientific literature adapted for classroom use to determine the central ideas or conclusions and/or to obtain scientific and/or technical information to summarize complex evidence, concepts, processes, or information presented in a text by paraphrasing them in simpler but still accurate terms.
·  Compare, integrate and evaluate sources of information presented in different media or formats (e.g., visually, quantitatively) as well as in words in order to address a scientific question or solve a problem.
·  Gather, read, and evaluate scientific and/or technical information from multiple authoritative sources, assessing the evidence and usefulness of each source.
·  Evaluate the validity and reliability of and/or synthesize multiple claims, methods, and/or designs that appear in scientific and technical texts or media reports, verifying the data when possible.
 
Crosscutting Concepts
Structure and Function The way an object is shaped or structured determines many of its properties and functions.
  ·  The functions and properties of natural and designed objects and systems can be inferred from their overall structure, the way their components are shaped and used, and the molecular substructures of its various materials.
 
Understandings about the Nature of Science
Scientific Investigations Use a Variety of Methods ·  Science investigations use diverse methods and do not always use the same set of procedures to obtain data.
·  Scientific inquiry is characterized by a common set of values that include:  logical thinking, precision, open-mindedness, objectivity, skepticism, replicability of results, and honest and ethical reporting of findings.
·  The discourse practices of science are organized around disciplinary domains that share exemplars for making decisions regarding the values, instruments, methods, models, and evidence to adopt and use.
·  Scientific investigations use a variety of methods, tools, and techniques to revise and produce new knowledge.
Science Addresses Questions About the Natural and Material World. ·  Science knowledge indicates what can happen in natural systems—not what should happen. The latter involves ethics, values, and human decisions about the use of knowledge.
·  Many decisions are not made using science alone, but rely on social and cultural contexts to resolve issues.
     
 
 
Common Core State Standards for High School Mathematics
Modeling standards are indicated by the star symbol (*) throughout other conceptual categories.
CCSS: Conceptual Category – Number and Quantity
Quantities ·         *Reason quantitatively and use units to solve problems.
The Complex Number System ·         Represent complex numbers and their operations on the complex plane.
 
CCSS: Conceptual Category – Functions
Linear, Quadratic, and Exponential Models ·         *Construct and compare linear, quadratic, and exponential models and solve problems.
·         *Interpret expressions for functions in terms of the situation they model.
 
CCSS: Conceptual Category – Geometry
Modeling with Geometry ·         *Apply geometric concepts in modeling situations.
 
CCSS: Conceptual Category – Statistics and Probability
Interpreting Categorical and Quantitative Data ·         *Summarize, represent, and interpret data on a single count or measurement variable.
Making Inferences and Justifying Conclusions ·         *Make inferences and justify conclusions from sample surveys, experiments, and observational studies.
Conditional Probability and the Rules of Probability ·         *Understand independence and conditional probability and use them to interpret data.
·         *Use the rules of probability to compute probabilities of compound events in a uniform probability model.
Using Probability to Make Decisions ·         *Calculate expected values and use them to solve problems.
 
 
Common Core State Standards for English Language Arts
CCSS: English Language Arts Standards » Science & Technical Subjects » Grade 9-10
Range of Reading and Level of Text Complexity ·  RST.9-10.10 – By the end of grade 10, read and comprehend science/technical texts in the grades 9-10 text complexity band independently and proficiently.
 
CCSS: English Language Arts Standards » Writing » Grade 9-10
Text Types and Purposes WHST.9-10.2 – Write informative/explanatory texts, including the narration of historical events, scientific procedures/ experiments, or technical processes.
·  WHST.9-10.2.A – Introduce a topic and organize ideas, concepts, and information to make important connections and distinctions; include formatting (e.g., headings), graphics (e.g., figures, tables), and multimedia when useful to aiding comprehension.
·  WHST.9-10.2.B – Develop the topic with well-chosen, relevant, and sufficient facts, extended definitions, concrete details, quotations, or other information and examples appropriate to the audience's knowledge of the topic.
·  WHST.9-10.2.D – Use precise language and domain-specific vocabulary to manage the complexity of the topic and convey a style appropriate to the discipline and context as well as to the expertise of likely readers.
·  WHST.9-10.2.F – Provide a concluding statement or section that follows from and supports the information or explanation presented (e.g., articulating implications or the significance of the topic).
Research to Build and Present Knowledge ·  WHST.9-10.9 – Draw evidence from informational texts to support analysis, reflection, and research.
Range of Writing ·  WHST.9-10.10 – Write routinely over extended time frames (time for reflection and revision) and shorter time frames (a single sitting or a day or two) for a range of discipline-specific tasks, purposes, and audiences.
     
 
 
Essential Questions
1.    What is respiration?
2.    What is circulation?
3.    How do the respiratory and circulatory systems work together?
4.    What is the difference between external and internal respiration?
5.    How are gases exchanged in the lungs?
6.    What is the concentration of carbon dioxide in air that is exhaled?
7.    What is the path of flow of blood throughout the body?
8.    What is the difference between systemic and pulmonary circulation?
9.    What is the difference between an artery and a vein?
10.  How do arteries and veins connecting with the lungs differ from arteries and veins connecting with other organs?
11.  What is blood pressure?
12.  How do respiration rates, pulse, and blood pressure respond to rest and exercise?
13.  What roles do hormones released by the endocrine system play in the body?
14.  How do the nervous, endocrine, and renal systems relate to other systems and reactions within an animal?
 
 
Key Terms
Alveolus Aorta Adrenal gland
Adrenaline Artery Atrium
Autonomic system Blood pressure Bromthymol blue
Bronchiole Bronchus Capillary
Cardiovascular Cellular respiration Central nervous system
Circulation Diaphragm Diastolic
Diffusion Endocrine Excretion
Exhalation Heart Heart rate
Homeostasis Hormone Inhalation
Kidney Larynx Lung
Nephron Nerve Neuron
Parasympathetic system Pharynx Physiology
Pituitary gland Pulmonary circulation Pulse
Receptor Renal Respiration
Respiration rate Sensory-somatic system Sphygmomanometer
Stethoscope Sympathetic system Systematic circulation
Systolic Thyroid gland Titration
Trachea Urinary system Vena cava
Ventricle    
 
Day-to-Day Plans
Time: 8 days
The teacher will refer to the Teacher Resources section for specific information on teaching this lesson, in particular Lesson 4.3 Teacher NotesLesson 4.3 GlossaryLesson 4.3 Materials, and other support documents.
Day 1:
·         The teacher will present ConceptsPerformance ObjectivesEssential Questions, and Key Terms in order to provide a lesson overview.
·         The teacher will provide students with a copy of Activity 4.3.1 Show What I Know.
·         Students will work independently to complete Activity 4.3.1 Show What I Know.
·         The teacher will provide students with a copy of Presentation Notes pages to be used throughout the lessons to record notes and reflections.
·         The teacher will present PowerPoint® Respiratory and Circulatory Anatomy.
·         Students will take notes using Presentation Notes pages if needed.
·         Students will correct Activity 4.3.1 Show What I Know and add any parts or functions they are missing.
Day 2:
·         The teacher will provide students with a copy of Activity 4.3.2 Take a Deep Breath.
·         Students will work in groups of four to complete Activity 4.3.2 Take a Deep Breath.
Day 3 – 4:
·         The teacher will provide students with a copy of Project 4.3.3 Cruising With a Blood Cell and Project 4.3.3 Evaluation Rubric.
·         Students will work in pairs to complete Project 4.3.3 Cruising With a Blood Cell.
·         The teacher will assess student work using Project 4.3.3 Evaluation Rubric.
Day 5 – 6:
·         The teacher will provide students with a copy of Activity 4.3.4 Raising the BeatLab Report Template, and Lab Report Evaluation Rubric.
·         The teacher will demonstrate the proper procedures for determining respiration rate, pulse, and blood pressure.
·         Students will work in teams of three to complete Part One and begin Part Two of Activity 4.3.4 Raising the Beat.
·         HOMEWORK: Students will independently prepare a lab report on their findings from Activity 4.3.4 Raising the Beat. The lab report will be due in three days.
Day 7 – 8:
·         The teacher will present PowerPoint® Nerves, Hormones, and Kidneys.
·         Students will take notes using the Presentation Notes pages provided.
·         The teacher will provide students with a copy of Project 4.3.5 Mapping Reactions and Project 4.3.5 Evaluation Rubric.
·   &am

January 23-27

date 01/23/2017 author Debbie Barkela category Uncategorized comment Leave a comment

Ag 1
Lesson 3.3 – Totally Cellular
 
Preface
Cells are the building blocks of life, but they also provide a foundation for studies in agriculture. Three important biological aspects related to the cell are introduced to students during this lesson that build their basic knowledge of the importance of cells. The three areas introduced in this lesson include cell parts and function, DNA, and genetic inheritance. In the process, students will sharpen their skills using microscopes, laboratory chemicals, and Inspiration® software.
 
This lesson begins with a journey inside the cell using Cells Alive® simulations. Next students prepare a slide to view a real cell under a microscope. Once basic organelles are introduced and identified, students dive into DNA by extracting DNA material from fruit. Students construct DNA models to build on their knowledge of DNA structure and learn the relationship between DNA and genetic inheritance. The lesson is completed after the students recognize common clues related to genetic heritance in their own attributes.
 
Concepts
1.    Animal and plant cells have many similarities, especially in regards to cell function; however, there are important structural differences between the two cell types.
2.    The nucleus of an animal and a plant cell is important for several life sustaining processes, such as cell division and protein synthesis.
3.    DNA is genetic material that combined with protein comprises the chromosomes found inside animal and plant cell nuclei.
4.    Genes are a combination of DNA segments that define animal and plant physical appearance.
5.    Offspring of animals and plants derive their genetic traits from both parents.
 
Performance Objectives
It is expected that students will
·         Identify and label the parts of a cell including each cell organelle function.
·         Determine the differences in structural parts between an animal and plant cell.
·         Demonstrate the correct use of a microscope.
·         Prepare a microscope slide and identify the nucleus of an onion cell.
·         Extract the DNA bundles from strawberry tissue for observation.
·         Construct a DNA model and demonstrate how DNA replication happens in a cell.
·         Identify differences in physical features of people and trace their family traits.
·         Use mapping software to organize thoughts.
 
Standards and Benchmarks Addressed
AFNR Career Cluster – LifeKnowledge® and Cluster Skills Content Standards
Lesson 3.3 will address parts of the following performance elements:
 
CS.04. Performance Element: Systems: Examine roles within teams, work units, departments, organizations, inter-organizational systems, and the larger environment.
CS.07. Performance Element: Safety, Health, and Environmental: Demonstrate appropriate health and safety procedures for AFNR occupations.
CS.08. Performance Element: Technical Skills: Use tools, equipment, machinery and technology appropriate to work within areas related to AFNR.
CS.11. Performance Element: Scientific Inquiry: Utilize scientific inquiry as an investigative method.
 
AFNR Career Cluster – Plant Systems Career Pathway Content Standards
Lesson 3.3 will address parts of the following performance elements:
 
PS.01. Performance Element: Apply knowledge of plant classification, plant anatomy and plant physiology to the production and management of plants.
 
National Science Education Standards
Unifying Concepts and Processes: As a result of activities in grades K-12, all students should develop understanding and abilities aligned with the following concepts and processes:
·         Systems, order, and organization
·         Evidence, models, and explanation
·         Evolution and equilibrium
·         Form and function
Science as Inquiry – Content Standard A: As a result of their activities in grades 9-12, all students should develop understanding of
·         Abilities necessary to do scientific inquiry
Life Science – Content Standard C: As a result of their activities in grades 9-12, all students should develop understanding of
·         The cell
·         Molecular basis of heredity
·         Biological evolution
·         Matter, energy, and organization in living systems
 
Principles and Standards for School Mathematics

Measurement Instructional programs from pre-kindergarten through grade 12 should enable all students to apply appropriate techniques, tools, and formulas to determine measurements.
 
Standards for the English Language Arts
Standard 8 Students use a variety of technological and informational resources (e.g. libraries, databases, computer networks, video) to gather and synthesize information and to create and communicate knowledge.
Standard 12 Students use spoken, written and visual language to accomplish their own purposes (e.g. for learning, enjoyment, persuasion, and the exchange of information).
 
Essential Questions
1.    What is a cell?
2.    How are animal and plant cells similar?
3.    What different physical structures do animal and plant cells contain?
4.    What does the nucleus look like in terms of appearance?
5.    What is important about the nucleus of animal and plant cells?
6.    What is DNA?
7.    Why is DNA important for the development of animals and plants?
8.    What are genes?
9.    How are genes associated with DNA?
10. Why is an understanding of genes important for animal and plant production?
 
Key Terms
Adenine Cell membrane Cell wall
Cells Centriole Centrosome
Chloroplast Chromosome Cytoplasm
Cytosine Cytoskeleton Cytosol
DNA Eukaryote cell Genes
Golgi apparatus Guanine Inheritance
Lysosome Mitochondria Molecule
Nuclei Nucleolus Nucleotide
Nucleus Organelle Peroxisome
Precipitant Prokaryote Protein synthesis
Ribosome RNA Rough endoplasmic reticulum
Secretory vesicle Smooth endoplasmic reticulum Synthesis
Thymine Traits Vacuole
 
Day-to-Day Plans
Time: 8 days
The teacher will refer to the Teacher Resources section for specific information on teaching this lesson, in particular, Lesson 3.3 Teacher Notes, Lesson 3.3 Glossary, Lesson 3.3 Equipment and Supplies, and other support materials.

.
Day 4: Monday
·         The teacher will provide students Activity 3.3.3 Extracting DNA.
·         Students will work in pairs to complete Activity 3.3.3 Extracting DNA.
·         Students will complete conclusion questions for Activity 3.3.3 Extracting DNA.
·         The teacher will lead a class discussion regarding results of Activity 3.3.3 Extracting DNA and correct any misconceptions students have.
Day 5: Tues.
·         The teacher will provide students Presentation Notes pages to be used throughout the presentation to record notes and reflections. These pages are to be added to the Agriscience Notebook.
·         The teacher will present PowerPoint® DNA.
·         Students will take notes using the Presentation Notes pages provided by the teacher.
·         The teacher will provide students with a copy of Activity 3.3.4 DNA Models.
·         Students will work in pairs to complete Activity 3.3.4 DNA Models and complete conclusion questions.
Day 6: Wed.- Thurs.
·         The teacher will provide students with a copy of Activity 3.3.5 Our Physical Features.
·         The teacher will lead a brainstorming activity to compile a list of physical features according to Part One of Activity 3.3.5 Our Physical Features.
·         Students will complete Activity 3.3.5 Our Physical Features and Conclusion questions.
·         The teacher will provide students Project 3.3.6 Family Traits.
·         HOMEWORK: Students will research information related to their personal family traits for Project 3.3.6 Family Traits.
Day 7:
·         Students will work independently to complete Project 3.3.6 Family Traits and submit for grading.
·         The teacher will assess student work using Project 3.3.6 Evaluation Rubric.
Day 8: Friday
·         The teacher will distribute Lesson 3.3 Check for Understanding.

Ag 2
Lesson 4.2 Putting the Puzzle Together
 
Preface
Animal anatomy is broken into two categories; external parts and internal organs. External parts can vary among species of animals, and some animals will have specific parts that others do not, such as a pouch found on kangaroos and other marsupials. Knowledge of external parts provides common terminology for animal producers, scientists, and veterinarians to communicate about animal features.
 
Internal organs and the various parts that comprise internal organs share the same importance as external parts; however, unlike external parts that primarily define animal structure and mobility, internal organs of animals have specific life functions as part of physiological systems. Animal systems are responsible for all of the life processes including circulation, digestion, endocrine secretion, excretion, nervous function, reproduction, and respiration. The understanding of internal parts and their functions are relevant for students to piece together how each system completes essential life sustaining processes.
 
In this lesson, students will examine common external parts and complete a series of dissections of internal systems found in animals. Students will be completing dissections, so it is recommended to check school policy regarding animal specimens and parental approval.
 
Concepts Performance Objectives
Students will know and understand Students will learn concepts by doing
1. External body parts of animals vary among different species and are important as reference tools for animal selection, health, and management. ·  Identify common external animal parts and explain the purpose of each. (Activity 4.2.1)
·  Identify unique external parts specific for livestock and poultry species and explain the purpose of each part. (Activity 4.2.1)
2. A collection of organized cells create tissue responsible for various life sustaining functions. ·  Examine two types of muscle tissue and describe the differences. (Activity 4.2.2)
3. The collection of epithelial, connective, muscle, and nerve tissues interact to perform specific functions within the body of an animal. ·  Dissect a chicken wing and identify epithelial and connective tissues. (Activity 4.2.2)
4. The body structure of a vertebrate animal is comprised of a skeleton made of bone and cartilage with ligaments attached to muscle tissue to provide motion. ·  Dissect a chicken wing and observe how tendons and ligaments provide movement to the structure of the skeleton. (Activity 4.2.2)
5. Multiple organs work together and form physiological systems. ·  Dissect a fetal pig and identify internal parts and organs that comprise systems. (Activity 4.2.3)
 
 
National AFNR Career Cluster Content Standards Alignment
AFNR: LifeKnowledge® and Cluster Skills Content Standards
CS.04. Systems: Examine roles within teams, work units, departments, organizations, inter-organizational systems, and the larger environment.
CS.07. Safety, Health, and Environmental: Demonstrate appropriate health and safety procedures for AFNR occupations.
CS.08. Technical Skills: Use tools, equipment, machinery and technology appropriate to work within areas related to AFNR.
 
AFNR: Animal Systems Career Pathway Content Standards
AS.02. Classify, evaluate, select, and manage animals based on anatomical and physiological characteristics.
 
 
Next Generation Science Standards Alignment
Disciplinary Core Ideas
Life Science
LS1: From Molecules to Organisms: Structures and Processes
LS1.A: Structure and Function ·  Systems of specialized cells within organisms help them perform the essential functions of life.
·  Multicellular organisms have a hierarchical structural organization, in which any one system is made up of numerous parts and is itself a component of the next level.
·  Feedback mechanisms maintain a living system’s internal conditions within certain limits and mediate behaviors, allowing it to remain alive and functional even as external conditions change within some range. Feedback mechanisms can encourage (through positive feedback) or discourage (negative feedback) what is going on inside the living system.
 
Science and Engineering Practices
Developing and Using Models Modeling in 9–12 builds on K–8 experiences and progresses to using, synthesizing, and developing models to predict and show relationships among variables between systems and their components in the natural and designed world(s).
·  Develop and/or use a model (including mathematical and computational) to generate data to support explanations, predict phenomena, analyze systems, and/or solve problems.
 
Crosscutting Concepts
Systems and System Models A system is an organized group of related objects or components; models can be used for understanding and predicting the behavior of systems.
  ·  Models (e.g., physical, mathematical, computer models) can be used to simulate systems and interactions—including energy, matter, and information flows—within and between systems at different scales.
·  Models can be used to predict the behavior of a system, but these predictions have limited precision and reliability due to the assumptions and approximations inherent in models.
Structure and Function The way an object is shaped or structured determines many of its properties and functions.
  ·  The functions and properties of natural and designed objects and systems can be inferred from their overall structure, the way their components are shaped and used, and the molecular substructures of its various materials.
     
 
 
Common Core State Standards for English Language Arts
CCSS: English Language Arts Standards » Science & Technical Subjects » Grade 9-10
Range of Reading and Level of Text Complexity ·  RST.9-10.10 – By the end of grade 10, read and comprehend science/technical texts in the grades 9-10 text complexity band independently and proficiently.
 
CCSS: English Language Arts Standards » Writing » Grade 9-10
Production and Distribution of Writing ·  WHST.9-10.4 – Produce clear and coherent writing in which the development, organization, and style are appropriate to task, purpose, and audience.
     
 
 
Essential Questions
1.    Why are external parts necessary to know?
2.    What common external parts are found on all livestock species?
3.    What is a dissection?
4.    What is an organ?
5.    How are tissues formed in the body of an animal?
6.    What are the different types of tissues in the body of an animal?
7.    What is the body structure of a vertebrate?
8.    What are the purposes of bone besides physical structure?
9.    What is the purpose of tendons?
10.  What is the purpose of ligaments?
11.  How do muscle tissues differ based on their location in the body of an animal?
12.  What is the largest internal organ in the body of an animal?
13.  How do multiple organs work together in the body of an animal?
14.  What is the relationship between external body parts and internal systems?
15.  What are the main functions of the respiratory system?
16.  What organs make up the respiratory system, digestive system, circulatory system, nervous and endocrine system?
17.  What are the main functions of the digestive system?
18.  What are the main functions of the nervous and endocrine systems?
 
Key Terms
Anatomy Bone Cardiac
Cartilage Circulation Digestion
Epithelial layer External Hock
Internal Ligament Monogastric
Muscle tissue Organ Physiology
Reproductive system Respiration Ruminant
Tendon Tissue Vertebrate
 
Day-to-Day Plans
Time: 6 days
The teacher will refer to the Teacher Resources section for specific information on teaching this lesson, in particular Lesson 4.2 Teacher NotesLesson 4.2 GlossaryLesson 4.2 Materials, and other support documents.
Day 1:
·         The teacher will present ConceptsPerformance ObjectivesEssential Questions, and Key Terms in order to provide a lesson overview.
·         The teacher will provide students with a copy of Activity 4.2.1 External Anatomy.
·         Students will work independently to complete Activity 4.2.1 External Anatomy.
·         The teacher will provide students Presentation Notes pages to be used throughout the presentation to record notes and reflections. These pages are to be added to the Agriscience Notebook.
·         The teacher will present PowerPoint® Tissues.
·         Students will take notes using the Presentation Notes pages.
Day 2:
·         The teacher will provide students with a copy of Activity 4.2.2 Just Winging It.
·         Students will work in pairs to complete Activity 4.2.2 Just Winging It.
·         Homework: Students will read pages 112 – 116 of the classroom text Modern Livestock and Poultry Production related to digestive systems.
Day 3:
·         The teacher will provide students with a copy of Activity 4.2.3 Inside Investigation.
·         Students will access the Virtual Pig Dissection website at http://www.whitman.edu/biology/vpd/main.html and review the Study Guide for Anatomical References and Digestive System as instructed in Activity 4.2.3 Inside Investigation.
·         Students will work in pairs to complete Part One of Activity 4.2.3 Inside Investigation.
·         The teacher will carefully observe students while monitoring correct procedures and safety.
·         The teacher will ask students to identify parts of the digestive system to verify they have completed Part One of Activity 4.2.3 Inside Investigation.
Day 4:
·         Students will access the Virtual Pig Dissection website at http://www.whitman.edu/biology/vpd/main.html and review the Study Guide for Circulatory System and Respiratory System as instructed in Activity 4.2.3 Inside Investigation.
·         Students will work in pairs to complete Part Two of Activity 4.2.3 Inside Investigation.
·         The teacher will carefully observe students while monitoring correct procedures and safety.
·         The teacher will ask students to identify parts of the circulatory and respiratory systems to verify they have completed Part Two of Activity 4.2.3 Inside Investigation.
Day 5:
·         Students will access the Virtual Pig Dissection website at http://www.whitman.edu/biology/vpd/main.html and review the Study Guide for Excretory System, Sexing Your Pig, Reproductive System, and Nervous System as instructed in Activity 4.2.3 Inside Investigation.
·         Students will work in pairs to complete Part Three of Activity 4.2.3 Inside Investigation.
·         The teacher will carefully observe students while monitoring correct procedures and safety.
·         The teacher will ask students to identify parts of the excretory, reproductive, and nervous system to verify they have completed Part Three of Activity 4.2.3 Inside Investigation.
Day 6:
·         The teacher will distribute Lesson 4.2 Check for Understanding.

Ag 3
This week students will be closing out their 2016 Records and completing their Iowa Degree Application.  Due January 27

Jr. High
Lesson 1.1 – Agriculture Everyday
 
Preface
Agriculture and natural resources provide the basic needs, including food, clothing, and shelter for human populations. Agriculture was the foundation for the shift from the nomadic lifestyle of a hunter-gatherer to settled, community-based societies. The advancements in agriculture have allowed fewer people to be involved in the production of agricultural goods. This allows more people to live further from farms and ranches and to devote more time to nonagricultural ventures.
 
Production of agricultural commodities occurs throughout the United States of America and plays a critical role in both our food supply and our economy. Much of the food and fiber consumed in the United States is produced here, yet only a small percentage of people are directly involved in production.
 
In this lesson, students will explore how agriculture provides for their basic needs, what commodities are produced in the United States of America, and how those commodities move from producer to consumer. Students will also complete an activity to develop an organizational system for notes and records that will be used throughout this course.
 
Concepts
1.    Agriculture and natural resource systems provide the three basic human needs of food, clothing, and shelter.
2.    Organization and record keeping are important to the success of an agricultural business.
3.    Agriculture is a broad field of study that includes agriculture systems, natural resource management, science, business, communication, and leadership.
4.    Production of agricultural commodities occurs within specific regions of the United States.
 
Performance Objectives
It is expected that students will
·         Determine if their basic needs are met after simulating the collection of resources during different situations.
·         Develop and keep an Agriscience Notebook to record and store information.
·         Interpret types of activities associated with agriculture from a case study about an agricultural entrepreneur.
·         Research top commodities produced in the United States and determine costs of food to consumers.
 
Standards and Benchmarks Addressed
AFNR Career Cluster – LifeKnowledge® and Cluster Skills Content Standards
Lesson 1.1 will address parts of the following performance elements:
 
CS.02. Performance Element: Personal Growth: Develop a skill set to enhance the positive evolution of the whole person.
CS.05. Performance Element: Systems: Identify how key organizational structures and processes affect organizational performance and the quality of products and services.
 
AFNR Career Cluster – Natural Resources Systems Career Pathway Content Standards
Lesson 1.1 will address parts of the following performance elements:
 
NRS.01. Performance Element: Explain interrelationships between natural resources and humans necessary to conduct management activities in natural environments.
 
National Science Education Standards
Unifying Concepts and Processes: As a result of activities in grades K-12, all students should develop understanding and abilities aligned with the following concepts and processes:
·         Systems, order, and organization
History and Nature of Science – Content Standard G: As a result of their activities in grades 9-12, all students should develop understanding of
·         Historical perspectives
 
Standards for the English Language Arts
Standard 8 Students use a variety of technological and informational resources (e.g. libraries, databases, computer networks, video) to gather and synthesize information and to create and communicate knowledge.
Standard 12 Students use spoken, written and visual language to accomplish their own purposes (e.g. for learning, enjoyment, persuasion, and the exchange of information).
 
Essential Questions
1.    What is agriculture?
2.    What are basic human needs?
3.    How has agriculture made life easier?
4.    What additional industries are related to agriculture?
5.    What is a commodity?
6.    What agricultural products are produced in the United States?
7.    What crops and animals are predominately grown in each region of the United States?
8.    What crops and animals are typically produced in my state?
9.    How much does food cost in the United States compared to other countries?
 
Key Terms
Agribusiness Agriculture Agriscience
Commodity Crop FFA
Fiber Food Input
Livestock Natural resources Poultry
SAE Shelter  
 
Day-to-Day Plans
Time: 5 days
The teacher will refer to the Teacher Resources section for specific information on teaching this lesson; in particular Lesson 1.1 Teacher Notes, Lesson 1.1 Glossary, Lesson 1.1 Equipment and Supplies, and other support materials.
Day 1:
·         The teacher will describe what Concepts, Performance Objectives, Essential Questions, and Key Terms are to prepare students for the pedagogy used in this course.
·         The teacher will present the Concepts, Performance Objectives, Essential Questions, and Key Terms for Lesson 1.1 Agriculture Everyday in order to provide a lesson overview.
·         The teacher will provide students with a copy of Activity 1.1.1 Basic Provisions.
·         The teacher will discuss the components of APP documents with students.
·         Students will work in groups of four to complete Activity 1.1.1 Basic Provisions.
·         The teacher will facilitate a discussion pertaining to the advances in agriculture and the correlation to lifestyles and leisure time.
Day 2:
·         The teacher will provide students with a copy of Activity 1.1.2 Agriscience Notebook.
·         Students will work individually to complete Activity 1.1.2 Agriscience Notebook.
·         The teacher will provide students Presentation Notes pages to be used throughout the presentation to record notes and reflections. These pages are to be added to the Agriscience Notebook.
·         The teacher will present PowerPoint® Facets of Agriculture.
·         Students will take notes using the Presentation Notes pages provided by the teacher and insert their completed notes into the correct section of their Agriscience Notebook.
Day 3:  Monday 
·         The teacher will complete the presentation of PowerPoint® Facets of Agriculture, if necessary.
·         The teacher will provide students with a copy of Activity 1.1.3 Popp’n with Orville.
·         Students will work individually to complete Activity 1.1.3 Popp’n with Orville.
Day 4:  Tuesday Quiz
·         The teacher will provide students with a copy of Activity 1.1.4 Grown in the USA.
·         Students will work with a partner to complete Activity 1.1.4 Grown in the USA.
Day 5: Friday Essential Questions are due
·         Students will complete Activity 1.1.4 Grown in the USA, if needed.
· &

January 3-6

date 01/03/2017 author Debbie Barkela category Uncategorized comment Leave a comment

Ag 1
Lesson 3.3 – Totally Cellular
 
Preface
Cells are the building blocks of life, but they also provide a foundation for studies in agriculture. Three important biological aspects related to the cell are introduced to students during this lesson that build their basic knowledge of the importance of cells. The three areas introduced in this lesson include cell parts and function, DNA, and genetic inheritance. In the process, students will sharpen their skills using microscopes, laboratory chemicals, and Inspiration® software.
 
This lesson begins with a journey inside the cell using Cells Alive® simulations. Next students prepare a slide to view a real cell under a microscope. Once basic organelles are introduced and identified, students dive into DNA by extracting DNA material from fruit. Students construct DNA models to build on their knowledge of DNA structure and learn the relationship between DNA and genetic inheritance. The lesson is completed after the students recognize common clues related to genetic heritance in their own attributes.
 
Concepts
1.    Animal and plant cells have many similarities, especially in regards to cell function; however, there are important structural differences between the two cell types.
2.    The nucleus of an animal and a plant cell is important for several life sustaining processes, such as cell division and protein synthesis.
3.    DNA is genetic material that combined with protein comprises the chromosomes found inside animal and plant cell nuclei.
4.    Genes are a combination of DNA segments that define animal and plant physical appearance.
5.    Offspring of animals and plants derive their genetic traits from both parents.
 
Performance Objectives
It is expected that students will
·         Identify and label the parts of a cell including each cell organelle function.
·         Determine the differences in structural parts between an animal and plant cell.
·         Demonstrate the correct use of a microscope.
·         Prepare a microscope slide and identify the nucleus of an onion cell.
·         Extract the DNA bundles from strawberry tissue for observation.
·         Construct a DNA model and demonstrate how DNA replication happens in a cell.
·         Identify differences in physical features of people and trace their family traits.
·         Use mapping software to organize thoughts.
 
Standards and Benchmarks Addressed
AFNR Career Cluster – LifeKnowledge® and Cluster Skills Content Standards
Lesson 3.3 will address parts of the following performance elements:
 
CS.04. Performance Element: Systems: Examine roles within teams, work units, departments, organizations, inter-organizational systems, and the larger environment.
CS.07. Performance Element: Safety, Health, and Environmental: Demonstrate appropriate health and safety procedures for AFNR occupations.
CS.08. Performance Element: Technical Skills: Use tools, equipment, machinery and technology appropriate to work within areas related to AFNR.
CS.11. Performance Element: Scientific Inquiry: Utilize scientific inquiry as an investigative method.
 
AFNR Career Cluster – Plant Systems Career Pathway Content Standards
Lesson 3.3 will address parts of the following performance elements:
 
PS.01. Performance Element: Apply knowledge of plant classification, plant anatomy and plant physiology to the production and management of plants.
 
National Science Education Standards
Unifying Concepts and Processes: As a result of activities in grades K-12, all students should develop understanding and abilities aligned with the following concepts and processes:
·         Systems, order, and organization
·         Evidence, models, and explanation
·         Evolution and equilibrium
·         Form and function
Science as Inquiry – Content Standard A: As a result of their activities in grades 9-12, all students should develop understanding of
·         Abilities necessary to do scientific inquiry
Life Science – Content Standard C: As a result of their activities in grades 9-12, all students should develop understanding of
·         The cell
·         Molecular basis of heredity
·         Biological evolution
·         Matter, energy, and organization in living systems
 
Principles and Standards for School Mathematics

Measurement Instructional programs from pre-kindergarten through grade 12 should enable all students to apply appropriate techniques, tools, and formulas to determine measurements.
 
Standards for the English Language Arts
Standard 8 Students use a variety of technological and informational resources (e.g. libraries, databases, computer networks, video) to gather and synthesize information and to create and communicate knowledge.
Standard 12 Students use spoken, written and visual language to accomplish their own purposes (e.g. for learning, enjoyment, persuasion, and the exchange of information).
 
Essential Questions
1.    What is a cell?
2.    How are animal and plant cells similar?
3.    What different physical structures do animal and plant cells contain?
4.    What does the nucleus look like in terms of appearance?
5.    What is important about the nucleus of animal and plant cells?
6.    What is DNA?
7.    Why is DNA important for the development of animals and plants?
8.    What are genes?
9.    How are genes associated with DNA?
10. Why is an understanding of genes important for animal and plant production?
 
Key Terms
Adenine Cell membrane Cell wall
Cells Centriole Centrosome
Chloroplast Chromosome Cytoplasm
Cytosine Cytoskeleton Cytosol
DNA Eukaryote cell Genes
Golgi apparatus Guanine Inheritance
Lysosome Mitochondria Molecule
Nuclei Nucleolus Nucleotide
Nucleus Organelle Peroxisome
Precipitant Prokaryote Protein synthesis
Ribosome RNA Rough endoplasmic reticulum
Secretory vesicle Smooth endoplasmic reticulum Synthesis
Thymine Traits Vacuole
 
Day-to-Day Plans
Time: 8 days
The teacher will refer to the Teacher Resources section for specific information on teaching this lesson, in particular, Lesson 3.3 Teacher Notes, Lesson 3.3 Glossary, Lesson 3.3 Equipment and Supplies, and other support materials.
Day 1 – 2:
·         The teacher will present Concepts, Performance Objectives, Key Terms, and Essential Questions in order to provide a lesson overview.
·         The teacher will provide students with a copy of Activity 3.3.1 Cell Parts.
·         Students will work in pairs to complete Activity 3.3.1 Cell Parts.
·         The teacher will have students complete the conclusion questions for Activity 3.3.1 Cell Parts and collect activity sheets once completed.
·         The teacher will use Activity 3.3.1 Answer Key for grading.
Day 3:
·         Students will submit their Lab Reports for Activity 3.2.2 Life, Death, and pH.
·         The teacher will assess student work using Lab Report Evaluation Rubric.
·         The teacher will review microscope care found in the AFNR Laboratory Safety Manual and demonstrate proper microscope handling and use to students.
·         The teacher will provide students with a copy of Activity 3.3.2 A Nuclear Onion.
·         Students will work in pairs to demonstrate their skill using a microscope and identify the cell structures in Activity 3.3.2 A Nuclear Onion.
Day 4:
·         The teacher will provide students Activity 3.3.3 Extracting DNA.
·         Students will work in pairs to complete Activity 3.3.3 Extracting DNA.
·         Students will complete conclusion questions for Activity 3.3.3 Extracting DNA.
·         The teacher will lead a class discussion regarding results of Activity 3.3.3 Extracting DNA and correct any misconceptions students have.
Day 5:
·         The teacher will provide students Presentation Notes pages to be used throughout the presentation to record notes and reflections. These pages are to be added to the Agriscience Notebook.
·         The teacher will present PowerPoint® DNA.
·         Students will take notes using the Presentation Notes pages provided by the teacher.
·         The teacher will provide students with a copy of Activity 3.3.4 DNA Models.
·         Students will work in pairs to complete Activity 3.3.4 DNA Models and complete conclusion questions.
Day 6:
·         The teacher will provide students with a copy of Activity 3.3.5 Our Physical Features.
·         The teacher will lead a brainstorming activity to compile a list of physical features according to Part One of Activity 3.3.5 Our Physical Features.
·         Students will complete Activity 3.3.5 Our Physical Features and Conclusion questions.
·         The teacher will provide students Project 3.3.6 Family Traits.
·         HOMEWORK: Students will research information related to their personal family traits for Project 3.3.6 Family Traits.
Day 7:
·         Students will work independently to complete Project 3.3.6 Family Traits and submit for grading.
·         The teacher will assess student work using Project 3.3.6 Evaluation Rubric.
Day 8:
·         The teacher will distribute Lesson 3.3 Check for Understanding.
·         Students will complete Lesson 3.3 Check for Understanding and submit for grading.


Ag 2
Lesson 4.1 Units of Life
 
Preface
Cells are the basic unit of life; they are the smallest structure that can carry out the functions necessary for growth and production. Functions such as converting nutrients into energy for the animal, regulating temperature and pressure, and cellular reproduction are conducted by cells every minute.
 
Cellular respiration is the most common metabolic process associated with animals. Temperature, oxygen, and energy are factors that affect respiration. Cellular respiration is essential to the production of energy. As cells convert energy, they need to move molecules in and out through the outer covering of the cell. Diffusion and osmosis assist in moving molecules in and out of the cells. Diffusion is the movement of molecules from a high concentration to a low concentration. Osmosis is the diffusion of water through a membrane.
 
In this lesson, students will review cell organelles and structure introduced in the previous course Introduction to Agriculture, Food, and Natural Resources. Students will review each cell part and determine the contribution a cell makes to the function of an animal. Students will explore the transfer of molecules in and out of the cell by diffusion and osmosis, as well as how food sources affect cellular respiration. By the conclusion of the lesson, students will understand the function of cell parts and the means by which cells produce energy.
 
Concepts Performance Objectives
Students will know and understand Students will learn concepts by doing
1. Animal cells are comprised of many parts that have essential functions for the survival of animal tissue. ·  Identify and label animal cell organelles. (Activity 4.1.1)
·  Develop a pictorial representation of cell function. (Activity 4.1.1)
·  Examine and compare plant and animal cells and their structures under a microscope. (Activity 4.1.2)
2. Cells use water, oxygen, and glucose to produce energy and metabolic by-products of carbon dioxide and water. ·  Collect and analyze data to provide evidence of cell metabolism. (Activity 4.1.3)
3. Cells use the processes of osmosis and diffusion for the uptake of water and dissolved nutrients required for metabolism and growth. ·  Observe molecules moving across a membrane in a computer simulation. (Activity 4.1.4)
·  Conduct an experiment to simulate the process of osmosis in animal cells. (Activity 4.1.5)
 
 
National AFNR Career Cluster Content Standards Alignment
AFNR: LifeKnowledge® and Cluster Skills Content Standards
CS.08. Technical Skills: Use tools, equipment, machinery and technology appropriate to work within areas related to AFNR.
CS.11. Scientific Inquiry: Utilize scientific inquiry as an investigative method.
 
 
 
Next Generation Science Standards Alignment
Disciplinary Core Ideas
Life Science
LS1: From Molecules to Organisms: Structures and Processes
LS1.A: Structure and Function ·  Systems of specialized cells within organisms help them perform the essential functions of life.
·  Multicellular organisms have a hierarchical structural organization, in which any one system is made up of numerous parts and is itself a component of the next level.
LS1.C: Organization for Matter and Energy Flow in Organisms ·  As matter and energy flow through different organizational levels of living systems, chemical elements are recombined in different ways to form different products.
·  As a result of these chemical reactions, energy is transferred from one system of interacting molecules to another and release energy to the surrounding environment and to maintain body temperature. Cellular respiration is a chemical process whereby the bonds of food molecules and oxygen molecules are broken and new compounds are formed that can transport energy to muscles.
LS2: Ecosystems: Interactions, Energy, and Dynamics
LS2.B: Cycles of Matter and Energy Transfer in Ecosystems ·  Photosynthesis and cellular respiration (including anaerobic processes) provide most of the energy for life processes.
Physical Science
PS1: Matter and Its Interactions
PS1.B: Chemical Reactions ·  In many situations, a dynamic and condition-dependent balance between a reaction and the reverse reaction determines the numbers of all types of molecules present.
 
Science and Engineering Practices
Asking Questions and Defining Problems Asking questions and defining problems in 9–12 builds on K–8 experiences and progresses to formulating, refining, and evaluating empirically testable questions and design problems using models and simulations.
·  Evaluate a question to determine if it is testable and relevant.
·  Ask questions that can be investigated within the scope of the school laboratory, research facilities, or field (e.g., outdoor environment) with available resources and, when appropriate, frame a hypothesis based on a model or theory.
Planning and Carrying Out Investigations Planning and carrying out investigations in 9-12 builds on K-8 experiences and progresses to include investigations that provide evidence for and test conceptual, mathematical, physical, and empirical models.
·  Make directional hypotheses that specify what happens to a dependent variable when an independent variable is manipulated.
Analyzing and Interpreting Data Analyzing data in 9–12 builds on K–8 experiences and progresses to introducing more detailed statistical analysis, the comparison of data sets for consistency, and the use of models to generate and analyze data.
·  Analyze data using tools, technologies, and/or models (e.g., computational, mathematical) in order to make valid and reliable scientific claims or determine an optimal design solution.
Obtaining, Evaluating, and Communicating Information Obtaining, evaluating, and communicating information in 9–12 builds on K–8 experiences and progresses to evaluating the validity and reliability of the claims, methods, and designs.
·  Communicate scientific and/or technical information or ideas (e.g. about phenomena and/or the process of development and the design and performance of a proposed process or system) in multiple formats (including orally, graphically, textually, and mathematically).
 
Crosscutting Concepts
Structure and Function The way an object is shaped or structured determines many of its properties and functions.
  ·  Investigating or designing new systems or structures requires a detailed examination of the properties of different materials, the structures of different components, and connections of components to reveal its function and/or solve a problem.
·  The functions and properties of natural and designed objects and systems can be inferred from their overall structure, the way their components are shaped and used, and the molecular substructures of its various materials.
     
 
 
Understandings about the Nature of Science
Scientific Investigations Use a Variety of Methods ·  New technologies advance scientific knowledge.
·  Scientific inquiry is characterized by a common set of values that include:  logical thinking, precision, open-mindedness, objectivity, skepticism, replicability of results, and honest and ethical reporting of findings.
·  The discourse practices of science are organized around disciplinary domains that share exemplars for making decisions regarding the values, instruments, methods, models, and evidence to adopt and use.
·  Scientific investigations use a variety of methods, tools, and techniques to revise and produce new knowledge.
 
 
Common Core State Standards for High School Mathematics
Modeling standards are indicated by the star symbol (*) throughout other conceptual categories.
CCSS: Conceptual Category – Number and Quantity
The Real Number System ·         Use properties of rational and irrational numbers.
Quantities ·         *Reason quantitatively and use units to solve problems.
 
CCSS: Conceptual Category – Algebra
Seeing Structure in Expressions ·         *Write expressions in equivalent forms to solve problems.
Reasoning with Equations and Inequalities ·         *Represent and solve equations and inequalities graphically.
 
CCSS: Conceptual Category – Statistics and Probability
Interpreting Categorical and Quantitative Data ·         *Summarize, represent, and interpret data on a single count or measurement variable.
Making Inferences and Justifying Conclusions ·         *Make inferences and justify conclusions from sample surveys, experiments, and observational studies.
     
 
 
Common Core State Standards for English Language Arts
CCSS: English Language Arts Standards » Science & Technical Subjects » Grade 9-10
Range of Reading and Level of Text Complexity ·  RST.9-10.10 – By the end of grade 10, read and comprehend science/technical texts in the grades 9-10 text complexity band independently and proficiently.
 
CCSS: English Language Arts Standards » Writing » Grade 9-10
Production and Distribution of Writing ·  WHST.9-10.4 – Produce clear and coherent writing in which the development, organization, and style are appropriate to task, purpose, and audience.
     
 
 
Essential Questions
1.    What is the function of cell organelles and how do they work together?
2.    How do cells contribute to the overall function of an animal?
3.    How do animal cells convert raw nutrients into energy?
4.    What is cellular respiration?
5.    What are the by-products of cellular respiration?
6.    Why are animal cells important to understanding animal systems?
7.    How does a cell absorb water and nutrients?
8.    What is diffusion?
9.    What is osmosis?
10.  What is the difference between hypertonic, hypotonic, and isotonic?
11.  How does a cell reach equilibrium?
 
Key Terms
Absorption Aerobic Anaerobic
Anatomy Cell membrane Cellular respiration
Centrosome Concentration Cytoskeleton
Diffusion Endoplasmic reticulum Equilibrium
Epithelium Golgi (apparatus) Hibernation
Hypertonic Hypotonic Isotonic
Lateral Lysosome Membrane
Metabolism Mitochondria Nucleolus
Nucleus Osmosis Protoplast
Protoplasm Respiration Ribosome
Secretory vesicle Solute Tissue
Vacuole    
 
Day-to-Day Plans
Time: 8 days
The teacher will refer to the Teacher Resources section for specific information on teaching this lesson, in particular Lesson 4.1 Teacher NotesLesson 4.1 GlossaryLesson 4.1 Materials, and other support documents.
Day 1 – 2:
·         The teacher will present ConceptsPerformance ObjectivesEssential Questions, and Key Terms in order to provide a lesson overview.
·         The teacher will provide students a copy of Project 4.1.1 Cell Analogy Collage and Project 4.1.1 Evaluation Rubric, and explain the procedures and expectations.
·         Students will work independently to complete Project 4.1.1 Cell Analogy Collage.
·         Students will present Project 4.1.1 Cell Analogy Collage as specified by the teacher.
·         The teacher will assess Project 4.1.1 Cell Analogy Collage using Project 4.1.1 Evaluation Rubric.
Day 3:
·         The teacher will provide students a copy of Activity 4.1.2 Examining Cell Structure.
·         Students will work in pairs to complete Activity 4.1.2 Examining Cell Structure.
Day 4:
·         The teacher will provide students a copy of the Presentation Notes pages to be used throughout the lesson to record notes and reflections.
·         The teacher will present PowerPoint® Cell Respiration.
·         Students will take notes using the Presentation Notes pages.
·         The teacher will provide students a copy of Activity 4.1.3 Cellular Respiration Study and discuss procedures for completion of the activity.
Day 5:
·         Students will work in pairs to complete Activity 4.1.3 Cellular Respiration Study.
Day 6:
·         The teacher will provide students a copy of Activity 4.1.4 Moving Molecules.
·         Students will work independently to complete Activity 4.1.4 Moving Molecules.
Day 7:
·         The teacher will provide students a copy of Activity 4.1.5 Just Passing Through and demonstrate the laboratory set up of the experiment.
·         Students will work in pairs to complete Step 1 of Part One in Activity 4.1.5 Just Passing Through.
Day 8:
·         Students will complete Activity 4.1.5 Just Passing Through.
·         The teacher will distribute Lesson 4.1 Check for Understanding.

Ag 3
Students will be closing out their record books for 2016 and completing their Iowa Degree Applications.

Junior High
Students will be completing their AG CSI Project.  This will be the final project for the semester.  Once students are in presentation groups they will discuss the the careers that they will need to research for the project scenario. Projects will be due on January 12 and will be presented in class.

Ag Leadership-
Students will be working on planning activities for National FFA Week and completing Scholarship applications.

December 12-21

date 12/14/2016 author Debbie Barkela category Uncategorized comment Leave a comment

12/19/16

1st Hour        8:10am-9:40am

3rd Hour        9:50am-11:20am

Lunch            11:20am-12:15pm

5th Hour        12:20pm-1:50pm

7th Hour        2:00pm-3:30pm

 

12/20/16

2nd Hour        8:10am-9:40am

4th Hour        9:50am-11:20am

Lunch            11:20am-12:15pm

6th Hour        12:20pm-1:50pm-

8th Hour        2:00pm-3:30pm

 

12/21/16

1:00 Early Out Schedule Make up day in case of Snow

1st Hour        8:10am-8:40am

2nd Hour        8:44am-9:14am

3rd Hour        9:18am-9:48am

4th Hour        9:52am-10:22am

5r6th Hour        10:26am-10:56am

5th Hour

Lunch A        10:56am-11:18am

Lunch B        11:30am-11:52am

 

7th Hour        11:56am-12:26pm

8th Hour        12:30pm-1:00pm

 
Ag 1
Monday-Wednesday- We will be starting to work on FFA record books.
Thursday-Friday - Review for Fin
al Exam
 Final will be held on Tuesday.  Please see the Final Schedule below

Ag 2
This week students are working on housing requirements 
Final will be designing a facility for 25 head of livestock.  Each student will have a different species.  Final project will be due on Monday please see final schedule below.

Ag 3
Monday-Wednesday - Students are completing letter and Resume, Mock interviews will be held after winter break.
Final will be due on Monday it is an essay.

Junior High
Monday-Tuesday - Food Safety and distribution
Wednesday begin   final Farm to Fork Project- Students will present their project to class during final class period.

Animal Science
Monday-Tuesday review for final
Wednesday- Final Exam  Please bring book and complete survey before you leave.
 

Ag Leadership-
Completing FFA.org information for scholarships
Students Final is an Essay- Why is Leadership important to agriculture. Due at the end of the class period on final day.

Please remember that the semester does not end until January 13 so there is still time for students to improve their grades.  Please feel free to talk with me if there is any questions.
 

February 22-26

date 02/19/2016 author Debbie Barkela category Uncategorized comment Leave a comment

Ag 1-
Lesson 3.3 – Totally Cellular
 
Preface
Cells are the building blocks of life, but they also provide a foundation for studies in agriculture. Three important biological aspects related to the cell are introduced to students during this lesson that build their basic knowledge of the importance of cells. The three areas introduced in this lesson include cell parts and function, DNA, and genetic inheritance. In the process, students will sharpen their skills using microscopes, laboratory chemicals, and Inspiration® software.
 
This lesson begins with a journey inside the cell using Cells Alive® simulations. Next students prepare a slide to view a real cell under a microscope. Once basic organelles are introduced and identified, students dive into DNA by extracting DNA material from fruit. Students construct DNA models to build on their knowledge of DNA structure and learn the relationship between DNA and genetic inheritance. The lesson is completed after the students recognize common clues related to genetic heritance in their own attributes.
 
Concepts
1.    Animal and plant cells have many similarities, especially in regards to cell function; however, there are important structural differences between the two cell types.
2.    The nucleus of an animal and a plant cell is important for several life sustaining processes, such as cell division and protein synthesis.
3.    DNA is genetic material that combined with protein comprises the chromosomes found inside animal and plant cell nuclei.
4.    Genes are a combination of DNA segments that define animal and plant physical appearance.
5.    Offspring of animals and plants derive their genetic traits from both parents.
 
Performance Objectives
It is expected that students will
·         Identify and label the parts of a cell including each cell organelle function.
·         Determine the differences in structural parts between an animal and plant cell.
·         Demonstrate the correct use of a microscope.
·         Prepare a microscope slide and identify the nucleus of an onion cell.
·         Extract the DNA bundles from strawberry tissue for observation.
·         Construct a DNA model and demonstrate how DNA replication happens in a cell.
·         Identify differences in physical features of people and trace their family traits.
·         Use mapping software to organize thoughts.
 
Standards and Benchmarks Addressed
AFNR Career Cluster – LifeKnowledge® and Cluster Skills Content Standards
Lesson 3.3 will address parts of the following performance elements:
 
CS.04. Performance Element: Systems: Examine roles within teams, work units, departments, organizations, inter-organizational systems, and the larger environment.
CS.07. Performance Element: Safety, Health, and Environmental: Demonstrate appropriate health and safety procedures for AFNR occupations.
CS.08. Performance Element: Technical Skills: Use tools, equipment, machinery and technology appropriate to work within areas related to AFNR.
CS.11. Performance Element: Scientific Inquiry: Utilize scientific inquiry as an investigative method.
 
AFNR Career Cluster – Plant Systems Career Pathway Content Standards
Lesson 3.3 will address parts of the following performance elements:
 
PS.01. Performance Element: Apply knowledge of plant classification, plant anatomy and plant physiology to the production and management of plants.
 
National Science Education Standards
Unifying Concepts and Processes: As a result of activities in grades K-12, all students should develop understanding and abilities aligned with the following concepts and processes:
·         Systems, order, and organization
·         Evidence, models, and explanation
·         Evolution and equilibrium
·         Form and function
Science as Inquiry – Content Standard A: As a result of their activities in grades 9-12, all students should develop understanding of
·         Abilities necessary to do scientific inquiry
Life Science – Content Standard C: As a result of their activities in grades 9-12, all students should develop understanding of
·         The cell
·         Molecular basis of heredity
·         Biological evolution
·         Matter, energy, and organization in living systems
 
Principles and Standards for School Mathematics
 

Measurement Instructional programs from pre-kindergarten through grade 12 should enable all students to apply appropriate techniques, tools, and formulas to determine measurements.
 
Standards for the English Language Arts
 
Standard 8 Students use a variety of technological and informational resources (e.g. libraries, databases, computer networks, video) to gather and synthesize information and to create and communicate knowledge.
Standard 12 Students use spoken, written and visual language to accomplish their own purposes (e.g. for learning, enjoyment, persuasion, and the exchange of information).
 
Essential Questions
1.    What is a cell?
2.    How are animal and plant cells similar?
3.    What different physical structures do animal and plant cells contain?
4.    What does the nucleus look like in terms of appearance?
5.    What is important about the nucleus of animal and plant cells?
6.    What is DNA?
7.    Why is DNA important for the development of animals and plants?
8.    What are genes?
9.    How are genes associated with DNA?
10. Why is an understanding of genes important for animal and plant production?
 
Key Terms
 
Adenine Cell membrane Cell wall
Cells Centriole Centrosome
Chloroplast Chromosome Cytoplasm
Cytosine Cytoskeleton Cytosol
DNA Eukaryote cell Genes
Golgi apparatus Guanine Inheritance
Lysosome Mitochondria Molecule
Nuclei Nucleolus Nucleotide
Nucleus Organelle Peroxisome
Precipitant Prokaryote Protein synthesis
Ribosome RNA Rough endoplasmic reticulum
Secretory vesicle Smooth endoplasmic reticulum Synthesis
Thymine Traits Vacuole
 

Monday:
·         Students will submit their Lab Reports for Activity 3.2.2 Life, Death, and pH.
·         The teacher will assess student work using Lab Report Evaluation Rubric.
·         The teacher will review microscope care found in the AFNR Laboratory Safety Manual and demonstrate proper microscope handling and use to students.
·         The teacher will provide students with a copy of Activity 3.3.2 A Nuclear Onion.
·         Students will work in pairs to demonstrate their skill using a microscope and identify the cell structures in Activity 3.3.2 A Nuclear Onion.
Tuesday:
·         The teacher will provide students Activity 3.3.3 Extracting DNA.
·         Students will work in pairs to complete Activity 3.3.3 Extracting DNA.
·         Students will complete conclusion questions for Activity 3.3.3 Extracting DNA.
·         The teacher will lead a class discussion regarding results of Activity 3.3.3 Extracting DNA and correct any misconceptions students have.
Wednesday:
·         The teacher will provide students Presentation Notes pages to be used throughout the presentation to record notes and reflections. These pages are to be added to the Agriscience Notebook.
·         The teacher will present PowerPoint® DNA.
·         Students will take notes using the Presentation Notes pages provided by the teacher.
·         The teacher will provide students with a copy of Activity 3.3.4 DNA Models.
·         Students will work in pairs to complete Activity 3.3.4 DNA Models and complete conclusion questions.
Thursday: Guest Speaker from New COOP sharing opportunities available through the coop system.

Friday: Guest speaker Brandon Hanson - State FFA
Monday:
·         The teacher will provide students with a copy of Activity 3.3.5 Our Physical Features.
·         The teacher will lead a brainstorming activity to compile a list of physical features according to Part One of Activity 3.3.5 Our Physical Features.
·         Students will complete Activity 3.3.5 Our Physical Features and Conclusion questions.
·         The teacher will provide students Project 3.3.6 Family Traits.
·         HOMEWORK: Students will research information related to their personal family traits for Project 3.3.6 Family Traits.
Tuesday:
·         Students will work independently to complete Project 3.3.6 Family Traits and submit for grading.
·         The teacher will assess student work using Project 3.3.6 Evaluation Rubric.
Wednesday
·         The teacher will distribute Lesson 3.3 Check for Understanding.
·         Students will complete Lesson 3.3 Check for Understanding and submit for grading.

Ag 2-
Lesson 5.1 Digestion Junction
 
Preface
The digestive system is of particular importance to animal producers. Understanding digestion aids in the selection of correct feeds, the efficient use of those feeds, and maintaining healthy animals. The digestive system, or alimentary canal, consists of the parts of the body beginning at the mouth and winding through the body to the anus. As food is digested, nutrients are absorbed in the body to produce energy and carry out essential life functions. Within the system are several organs that differ slightly between species of animals.
 
Ruminant animals, such as cattle, sheep, and goats, have a multi-chambered stomach that allows them to digest high fiber feeds with the bacterial and microbial action in their rumen. After eating, ruminants store food in their reticulum and regurgitate the food to chew it again. The compartments of the ruminant stomach include the rumen, reticulum, omasum, and abomasum. The abomasum is the closest compartment to a true stomach.
 
Monogastric animals, including pigs, dogs, cats, and humans, have a simple stomach and are not capable of digesting high fiber feeds, such as grass and hay. Horses and rabbits have an enlarged cecum that enables them to digest forages. The cecum is a blind pouch in other monogastrics, such as pigs and dogs, with little function.
 
In this lesson, students will learn about the complex digestive systems of animals. Students will explore the unique differences in digestive systems by building models, reviewing digestive terms, and observing the differences in animals.
 
 
Concepts Performance Objectives
Students will know and understand Students will learn concepts by doing
1. Digestive systems vary among species of animals. ·  Define the terminology commonly used in digestive anatomy. (Activity 5.1.1)
·  Match livestock species with the proper digestive system. (Activity 5.1.2)
2. Ruminants have a four-chambered stomach consisting of the rumen, reticulum, omasum, and abomasum, each with a specific function. ·  Label, identify, and explain the function of various parts of animal digestive systems. (Activity 5.1.3)
3. Digestion and absorption are accomplished through a process of mechanical, chemical, and biological decomposition of food in different digestive systems. ·  Build a model of a digestive system. (Project 5.1.4)
 
 
National AFNR Career Cluster Content Standards Alignment
 
AFNR: LifeKnowledge® and Cluster Skills Content Standards
CS.01. Premier Leadership: Acquire the skills necessary to positively influence others.
CS.04. Systems: Examine roles within teams, work units, departments, organizations, inter-organizational systems, and the larger environment.
CS.08. Technical Skills: Use tools, equipment, machinery and technology appropriate to work within areas related to AFNR.
CS.11. Scientific Inquiry: Utilize scientific inquiry as an investigative method.
 
AFNR: Animal Systems Career Pathway Content Standards
AS.02. Classify, evaluate, select, and manage animals based on anatomical and physiological characteristics.
AS.04. Apply principles of animal nutrition to ensure the proper growth, development, reproduction, and economic production of animals.
 
 
Next Generation Science Standards Alignment
 
Disciplinary Core Ideas
Life Science
LS1: From Molecules to Organisms: Structures and Processes
LS1.A: Structure and Function ·  Feedback mechanisms maintain a living system’s internal conditions within certain limits and mediate behaviors, allowing it to remain alive and functional even as external conditions change within some range. Feedback mechanisms can encourage (through positive feedback) or discourage (negative feedback) what is going on inside the living system.
LS1.C: Organization for Matter and Energy Flow in Organisms ·  As a result of these chemical reactions, energy is transferred from one system of interacting molecules to another and release energy to the surrounding environment and to maintain body temperature. Cellular respiration is a chemical process whereby the bonds of food molecules and oxygen molecules are broken and new compounds are formed that can transport energy to muscles.
 
Science and Engineering Practices
Developing and Using Models Modeling in 9–12 builds on K–8 experiences and progresses to using, synthesizing, and developing models to predict and show relationships among variables between systems and their components in the natural and designed world(s).
·  Develop, revise, and/or use a model based on evidence to illustrate and/or predict the relationships between systems or between components of a system.
Obtaining, Evaluating, and Communicating Information Obtaining, evaluating, and communicating information in 9–12 builds on K–8 experiences and progresses to evaluating the validity and reliability of the claims, methods, and designs.
·  Compare, integrate and evaluate sources of information presented in different media or formats (e.g., visually, quantitatively) as well as in words in order to address a scientific question or solve a problem.
·  Communicate scientific and/or technical information or ideas (e.g. about phenomena and/or the process of development and the design and performance of a proposed process or system) in multiple formats (including orally, graphically, textually, and mathematically).
 
Crosscutting Concepts
Structure and Function The way an object is shaped or structured determines many of its properties and functions.
  ·  The functions and properties of natural and designed objects and systems can be inferred from their overall structure, the way their components are shaped and used, and the molecular substructures of its various materials.
     
 
 
Common Core State Standards for English Language Arts
 
CCSS: English Language Arts Standards » Science & Technical Subjects » Grade 9-10
Integration of Knowledge and Ideas ·  RST.9-10.7Translate quantitative or technical information expressed in words in a text into visual form (e.g., a table or chart) and translate information expressed visually or mathematically (e.g., in an equation) into words.
Range of Reading and Level of Text Complexity ·  RST.9-10.10By the end of grade 10, read and comprehend science/technical texts in the grades 9-10 text complexity band independently and proficiently.
 
CCSS: English Language Arts Standards » Writing » Grade 9-10
Text Types and Purposes WHST.9-10.2Write informative/explanatory texts, including the narration of historical events, scientific procedures/ experiments, or technical processes.
Research to Build and Present Knowledge ·  WHST.9-10.8Gather relevant information from multiple authoritative print and digital sources, using advanced searches effectively; assess the usefulness of each source in answering the research question; integrate information into the text selectively to maintain the flow of ideas, avoiding plagiarism and following a standard format for citation.
Range of Writing ·  WHST.9-10.10Write routinely over extended time frames (time for reflection and revision) and shorter time frames (a single sitting or a day or two) for a range of discipline-specific tasks, purposes, and audiences.
     
 
 
Essential Questions
1.    What is a digestive system?
2.    What is a ruminant?
3.    What is a monogastric?
4.    How do methods of prehension differ among animals?
5.    How do different animals digest needed nutrients?
6.    What is the difference between a monogastric, ruminant, and avian digestive system?
7.    What are examples of animals with a ruminant, monogastric, pseudo-ruminant, and avian digestion system?
8.    Why do ruminants have a multi-chambered stomach?
9.    Where does most digestion of food occur?
 
Key Terms
 
Abomasum Absorption Alimentary canal
Anabolism Anterior Anus
Avian Bile Bolus
Cardia Cecum Chyme
Cloaca Concentrates Crop
Cud Digestion Digestive tract
Duodenum Enzyme Esophagus
Feed Gastrointestinal tract Gizzard
Gullet Ileum Jejunum
Large intestine Mastication Metabolism
Monogastric Mouth Omasum
Pancreas Posterior Prehension
Proventriculus Rectum Reticulum
Roughage Rumen Ruminant
Salivary glands Small intestine Stomach
Vent Villi  
 
Day-to-Day Plans
Time: 5 days
The teacher will refer to the Teacher Resources section for specific information on teaching this lesson, in particular Lesson 5.1 Teacher Notes, Lesson 5.1 Glossary, Lesson 5.1 Materials, and other support documents.
Day 1:
·         The teacher will present Concepts, Performance Objectives, Essential Questions, and Key Terms in order to provide a lesson overview.
·         The teacher will provide students with a copy of Activity 5.1.1 Terms of Digestion and distribute Activity 5.1.1 Matching Note Cards to students.
·         Students will work with a partner to match the terms to the corresponding definition.
·         The teacher will assess student learning with Activity 5.1.1 Answer Key.
·         The teacher will provide students with a copy of Activity 5.1.2 A Look Inside and prepare students for the video Digestive Systems of Livestock – A Basic Look.
Day 2:
·         The teacher will provide students with a topic to study from Lesson 5.1 Teacher Notes during the video.
·         Students will watch the video Digestive Systems of Livestock – A Basic Look and take notes on their topic using Activity 5.1.2 Student Worksheet.
·         Students will prepare and practice interviews for Activity 5.1.2 A Look Inside.
Day 3:
·         Students will practice and complete interviews for Activity 5.1.2 A Look Inside.
·         The teacher will provide students with a copy of Activity 5.1.3 My Stomach’s Bigger! and assign students to groups of four.
·         Students will divide the assignment amongst themselves and complete Activity 5.1.3 My Stomach’s Bigger!.
Days 4:
·         The teacher will provide students with a copy of Project 5.1.4 Digestion Murals and Project 5.1.4 Evaluation Rubric.
·         Students will return to their groups from Activity 5.1.3 My Stomach’s Bigger! and reassign digestive systems. Each student must pick a different system than the system researched in Activity 5.1.3 My Stomach’s Bigger!.
·         Students will complete Project 5.1.4 Digestion Murals.
Day 5:
·         Students will share Project 5.1.4 Digestion Murals within their groups.
·         The teacher will assess student learning using Project 5.1.4 Evaluation Rubric.
·         The teacher will distribute Lesson 5.1 Check for Understanding.

Ag 3-
Students will be Completing their Ag Issues project which presentations will be due this week on Wednesday.
Thursday: Guest speaker from New COOP on opportunities available through the coop system
Friday: Guest Speaker Brandon Hanson- Iowa State FFA

Ag  Leadership-
Monday-
Habitudes discussion of Image One- The half Hearted Kamikaze
Objectives:
           * Explain the difference between involvement and commitment as it relates to agricultural advocacy.
            * Describe the five stages of building personal convictions.
             * Formulate an action plan related to agricultural advocacy and leadership using the five stages of building convictions 
Tuesday - Finish working on action plan- Due end of class.
Wednesday-
Habitudes Image two- Facebook or T.V
Objectives:
        Explain the advantages of creating an interactive , social context to increase learning retention.
         Recognize the needs of an audience and how to best engage them.
         Utilize communication techniques to spark a dialog, not deliver a monologue.
          Communicate content in an EPIC delivery style.
Thursday- Guest Speaker Dillon Muhlenbrock from New COOP, he will be sharing opportunities with in the coop system,
Friday - Guest speaker Brandon Hanson- State FFA

Welding - Students will be working in the shop

Junior High-
Lesson 5.1 – Edible Agriculture
 
Preface
Agriculturalists produce a steady supply of crops and livestock for human consumption. The food derived from plants and animals provides humans with the nutrients needed for survival. The types of food consumed have changed over time with advancements in preservation, transportation, and technology.
 
In this lesson, students will record the types of food they consume in a twenty-four hour period and determine if their diet is mainly plant-based or animal-based. Students will also conduct an experiment to determine the effectiveness of preservation methods toward decreasing bacterial growth. Finally, they will track the path of agricultural goods from producer to consumer and solve a problem based on the outbreak of a foodborne illness.
 
Concepts
1.    Food is derived from animal and plant products.
2.    Consumption trends of food have changed over time based on an increase of information about health issues and technological advances.
3.    Food must be produced, transported, processed, and stored in a safe way.
4.    There are many points where food can be contaminated while in route to the consumer.
 
Performance Objectives
It is expected that students will
·         Document the plant and animal food products consumed in a twenty-four hour period.
·         Determine the percentage of plant and animal food products they consume.
·         Conduct an experiment to determine bacterial levels of meat samples when refrigerated, stored at room temperature, and cooked.
·         Observe and record growth of bacterial cultures.
·         Research the path a prepared food item takes from production to processing and present their findings to the class.
·         Solve a problem related to foodborne illness outbreak.
 
Standards and Benchmarks Addressed
AFNR Career Cluster – LifeKnowledge® and Cluster Skills Content Standards
Lesson 5.1 will address parts of the following performance elements:
 
CS.03. Performance Element: Career Success: Demonstrate those qualities, attributes and skills necessary to succeed in, or further prepare for, a chosen career while effectively contributing to society.
CS.05. Performance Element: Systems: Identify how key organizational structures and processes affect organizational performance and the quality of products and services.
CS.06. Performance Element: Examine the importance of health, safety, and environmental management systems in organizations and their importance to performance and regulatory compliance.
CS.07. Performance Element: Safety, Health, and Environmental: Demonstrate appropriate health and safety procedures for AFNR occupations.
 
AFNR Career Cluster – Animal Systems Career Pathway Content Standards
Lesson 5.1 will address parts of the following performance elements:
 
AS.01. Performance Element: Examine the components, historical development, global implications, and future trends of the animal systems industry.
 
AFNR Career Cluster – Biotechnology Systems Career Pathway Content Standards
Lesson 5.1 will address parts of the following performance elements:
 
BS.02. Performance Element: Demonstrate laboratory skills as applied to biotechnology.
 
AFNR Career Cluster – Food Products and Processing Systems Career Pathway Content Standards
Lesson 5.1 will address parts of the following performance elements:
 
FPP.01. Performance Element: Examine components of the food industry and historical development of food products and processing.
FPP.02. Performance Element: Apply safety principles, recommended equipment and facility management techniques to the food products and processing industry.
 
National Science Education Standards
Unifying Concepts and Processes: As a result of activities in grades K-12, all students should develop understanding and abilities aligned with

February 1-4

date 01/29/2016 author Debbie Barkela category Uncategorized comment Leave a comment

Ag 1
Lesson 3.3 – Totally Cellular
 
Preface
Cells are the building blocks of life, but they also provide a foundation for studies in agriculture. Three important biological aspects related to the cell are introduced to students during this lesson that build their basic knowledge of the importance of cells. The three areas introduced in this lesson include cell parts and function, DNA, and genetic inheritance. In the process, students will sharpen their skills using microscopes, laboratory chemicals, and Inspiration® software.
 
This lesson begins with a journey inside the cell using Cells Alive® simulations. Next students prepare a slide to view a real cell under a microscope. Once basic organelles are introduced and identified, students dive into DNA by extracting DNA material from fruit. Students construct DNA models to build on their knowledge of DNA structure and learn the relationship between DNA and genetic inheritance. The lesson is completed after the students recognize common clues related to genetic heritance in their own attributes.
 
Concepts
1.    Animal and plant cells have many similarities, especially in regards to cell function; however, there are important structural differences between the two cell types.
2.    The nucleus of an animal and a plant cell is important for several life sustaining processes, such as cell division and protein synthesis.
3.    DNA is genetic material that combined with protein comprises the chromosomes found inside animal and plant cell nuclei.
4.    Genes are a combination of DNA segments that define animal and plant physical appearance.
5.    Offspring of animals and plants derive their genetic traits from both parents.
 
Performance Objectives
It is expected that students will
·         Identify and label the parts of a cell including each cell organelle function.
·         Determine the differences in structural parts between an animal and plant cell.
·         Demonstrate the correct use of a microscope.
·         Prepare a microscope slide and identify the nucleus of an onion cell.
·         Extract the DNA bundles from strawberry tissue for observation.
·         Construct a DNA model and demonstrate how DNA replication happens in a cell.
·         Identify differences in physical features of people and trace their family traits.
·         Use mapping software to organize thoughts.
 
Standards and Benchmarks Addressed
AFNR Career Cluster – LifeKnowledge® and Cluster Skills Content Standards
Lesson 3.3 will address parts of the following performance elements:
 
CS.04. Performance Element: Systems: Examine roles within teams, work units, departments, organizations, inter-organizational systems, and the larger environment.
CS.07. Performance Element: Safety, Health, and Environmental: Demonstrate appropriate health and safety procedures for AFNR occupations.
CS.08. Performance Element: Technical Skills: Use tools, equipment, machinery and technology appropriate to work within areas related to AFNR.
CS.11. Performance Element: Scientific Inquiry: Utilize scientific inquiry as an investigative method.
 
AFNR Career Cluster – Plant Systems Career Pathway Content Standards
Lesson 3.3 will address parts of the following performance elements:
 
PS.01. Performance Element: Apply knowledge of plant classification, plant anatomy and plant physiology to the production and management of plants.
 
National Science Education Standards
Unifying Concepts and Processes: As a result of activities in grades K-12, all students should develop understanding and abilities aligned with the following concepts and processes:
·         Systems, order, and organization
·         Evidence, models, and explanation
·         Evolution and equilibrium
·         Form and function
Science as Inquiry – Content Standard A: As a result of their activities in grades 9-12, all students should develop understanding of
·         Abilities necessary to do scientific inquiry
Life Science – Content Standard C: As a result of their activities in grades 9-12, all students should develop understanding of
·         The cell
·         Molecular basis of heredity
·         Biological evolution
·         Matter, energy, and organization in living systems
 
Principles and Standards for School Mathematics
 

Measurement Instructional programs from pre-kindergarten through grade 12 should enable all students to apply appropriate techniques, tools, and formulas to determine measurements.
 
Standards for the English Language Arts
 
Standard 8 Students use a variety of technological and informational resources (e.g. libraries, databases, computer networks, video) to gather and synthesize information and to create and communicate knowledge.
Standard 12 Students use spoken, written and visual language to accomplish their own purposes (e.g. for learning, enjoyment, persuasion, and the exchange of information).
 
Essential Questions
1.    What is a cell?
2.    How are animal and plant cells similar?
3.    What different physical structures do animal and plant cells contain?
4.    What does the nucleus look like in terms of appearance?
5.    What is important about the nucleus of animal and plant cells?
6.    What is DNA?
7.    Why is DNA important for the development of animals and plants?
8.    What are genes?
9.    How are genes associated with DNA?
10. Why is an understanding of genes important for animal and plant production?
 
Key Terms
 
Adenine Cell membrane Cell wall
Cells Centriole Centrosome
Chloroplast Chromosome Cytoplasm
Cytosine Cytoskeleton Cytosol
DNA Eukaryote cell Genes
Golgi apparatus Guanine Inheritance
Lysosome Mitochondria Molecule
Nuclei Nucleolus Nucleotide
Nucleus Organelle Peroxisome
Precipitant Prokaryote Protein synthesis
Ribosome RNA Rough endoplasmic reticulum
Secretory vesicle Smooth endoplasmic reticulum Synthesis
Thymine Traits Vacuole
 
Day-to-Day Plans
Time: 10 days
The teacher will refer to the Teacher Resources section for specific information on teaching this lesson, in particular, Lesson 3.3 Teacher Notes, Lesson 3.3 Glossary, Lesson 3.3 Equipment and Supplies, and other support materials.
Day 1 – 2:
·         The teacher will present Concepts, Performance Objectives, Key Terms, and Essential Questions in order to provide a lesson overview.
·         The teacher will provide students with a copy of Activity 3.3.1 Cell Parts.
·         Students will work in pairs to complete Activity 3.3.1 Cell Parts.
·         The teacher will have students complete the conclusion questions for Activity 3.3.1 Cell Parts and collect activity sheets once completed.
·         The teacher will use Activity 3.3.1 Answer Key for grading.
Day 3:
·         Students will submit their Lab Reports for Activity 3.2.2 Life, Death, and pH.
·         The teacher will assess student work using Lab Report Evaluation Rubric.
·         The teacher will review microscope care found in the AFNR Laboratory Safety Manual and demonstrate proper microscope handling and use to students.
·         The teacher will provide students with a copy of Activity 3.3.2 A Nuclear Onion.
·         Students will work in pairs to demonstrate their skill using a microscope and identify the cell structures in Activity 3.3.2 A Nuclear Onion.
Day 4:
·         The teacher will provide students Activity 3.3.3 Extracting DNA.
·         Students will work in pairs to complete Activity 3.3.3 Extracting DNA.
·         Students will complete conclusion questions for Activity 3.3.3 Extracting DNA.
·         The teacher will lead a class discussion regarding results of Activity 3.3.3 Extracting DNA and correct any misconceptions students have.
Day 5:
·         The teacher will provide students Presentation Notes pages to be used throughout the presentation to record notes and reflections. These pages are to be added to the Agriscience Notebook.
·         The teacher will present PowerPoint® DNA.
·         Students will take notes using the Presentation Notes pages provided by the teacher.
·         The teacher will provide students with a copy of Activity 3.3.4 DNA Models.
·         Students will work in pairs to complete Activity 3.3.4 DNA Models and complete conclusion questions.
Day 6:
·         The teacher will provide students with a copy of Activity 3.3.5 Our Physical Features.
·         The teacher will lead a brainstorming activity to compile a list of physical features according to Part One of Activity 3.3.5 Our Physical Features.
·         Students will complete Activity 3.3.5 Our Physical Features and Conclusion questions.
·         The teacher will provide students Project 3.3.6 Family Traits.
·         HOMEWORK: Students will research information related to their personal family traits for Project 3.3.6 Family Traits.
Day 7:
·         Students will work independently to complete Project 3.3.6 Family Traits and submit for grading.
·         The teacher will assess student work using Project 3.3.6 Evaluation Rubric.
Day 8:
·         The teacher will distribute Lesson 3.3 Check for Understanding.
·         Students will complete Lesson 3.3 Check for Understanding and submit for grading.
 
Ag 2
Lesson 4.3 Breathing, Beating, and Body Controls
 
Preface
While Lesson 4.2 Putting the Puzzle Together focused on the anatomy of animals, this and the following lesson focus on the physiology of the parts studied in anatomy. Physiology is the study of the function of plant and animal bodies, systems, organs, tissues, and cells. Not all physiology lessons occur within this unit, digestive and reproductive physiology lessons are within their respective units of study. The respiratory and circulatory systems are two of the most basic systems of life. Without the flow of blood and intake of oxygen, mammals and other vertebrates cannot survive for long. The functions of the respiratory and circulatory systems are closely related in the body. Other body systems that are closely and tied to these are the nervous, renal, and endocrine systems.
 
The respiratory system exchanges oxygen from the air with carbon dioxide, the product of respiration, to maintain a balance in the body. Breathing brings air from the atmosphere into the lungs where it is delivered to the blood and exchanged for carbon dioxide to be expelled back into the atmosphere. Blood serves as a carrier of oxygen (O2) and carbon dioxide (CO2) from cells to the lungs.
 
The circulatory system works closely with the respiratory system, moving oxygen and carbon dioxide to and from the lungs. The major function of the circulatory system is to serve as a mechanism to deliver raw materials and remove wastes in the cells. The heart, the major organ of the circulatory system, serves as a pump for blood. It cycles blood from the veins to the lungs where oxygen levels are replenished, back to the heart, and out to other organs in the body.
 
The nervous system is like a mission control center, constantly collecting internal and external information throughout the body and transmitting appropriate bodily responses. The endocrine system is comprised of many glands that secrete chemical messages to organs within the body. These messages aid in maintaining homeostasis and regulating the growth, development, and metabolism of animals. Hormones act on target organs to produce a desired result. The renal or urinary system is the waste management system of cells. The renal system filters wastes produced in the cells out of blood and excretes it from the body. All of these systems work in harmony to maintain the essential processes needed to sustain life.
 
In this lesson, students will explore respiration and heart rate under various conditions. Students will also study the relationships of the nervous, renal, and endocrine systems as well as their connection to the respiratory and circulatory systems. Conducting these studies on animals is challenging, so students will test respiration and heart rate on themselves, but should realize many domestic animal systems are quite similar to their own. Students will design a concept map to depict the processes that occur in the body and how they are connected.
 
 
Concepts Performance Objectives
Students will know and understand Students will learn concepts by doing
1. The respiratory and circulatory systems are closely related and essential for animal life. ·  Identify and explain the function of the parts of the respiratory and circulatory systems. (Activity 4.3.1)
2. External respiration is a process of gas exchanges between the lungs and blood. ·  Describe the process of gas exchange in external respiration. (Activity 4.3.2)
·  Determine the presence of carbon dioxide in exhaled air. (Activity 4.3.2)
3. The circulatory system relies on the heart to pump blood throughout the body. ·  Design a travel brochure that highlights the flow of blood throughout the body. (Project 4.3.3)
4. Respiration and heart rates may be affected by external conditions, such as temperature and physical activity. ·  Conduct an inquiry on the effects of external conditions on respiration rate, pulse, and blood pressure. (Activity 4.3.4)
5. The nervous, endocrine, and renal systems work together to transmit signals, secrete hormones, and filter wastes. ·  Map the functions of body systems, specifically the nervous, endocrine, and renal systems in order to demonstrate their connection to each other and other systems in the body. (Project 4.3.5)
 
 
National AFNR Career Cluster Content Standards Alignment
 
AFNR: LifeKnowledge® and Cluster Skills Content Standards
CS.04. Systems: Examine roles within teams, work units, departments, organizations, inter-organizational systems, and the larger environment.
CS.11. Scientific Inquiry: Utilize scientific inquiry as an investigative method.
 
AFNR: Animal Systems Career Pathway Content Standards
AS.02. Classify, evaluate, select, and manage animals based on anatomical and physiological characteristics.
 
 
Next Generation Science Standards Alignment
 
Disciplinary Core Ideas
Life Science
LS1: From Molecules to Organisms: Structures and Processes
LS1.A: Structure and Function ·  Systems of specialized cells within organisms help them perform the essential functions of life.
·  Multicellular organisms have a hierarchical structural organization, in which any one system is made up of numerous parts and is itself a component of the next level.
·  Feedback mechanisms maintain a living system’s internal conditions within certain limits and mediate behaviors, allowing it to remain alive and functional even as external conditions change within some range. Feedback mechanisms can encourage (through positive feedback) or discourage (negative feedback) what is going on inside the living system.
 
Science and Engineering Practices
Asking Questions and Defining Problems Asking questions and defining problems in 9–12 builds on K–8 experiences and progresses to formulating, refining, and evaluating empirically testable questions and design problems using models and simulations.
·  Ask questions that arise from careful observation of phenomena, or unexpected results
?      to clarify and/or seek additional information.
?      to determine relationships, including quantitative relationships, between independent and dependent variables.
·  Evaluate a question to determine if it is testable and relevant.
·  Ask questions that can be investigated within the scope of the school laboratory, research facilities, or field (e.g., outdoor environment) with available resources and, when appropriate, frame a hypothesis based on a model or theory.
·  Define a design problem that involves the development of a process or system with interacting components and criteria and constraints that may include social, technical and/or environmental considerations.
Planning and Carrying Out Investigations Planning and carrying out investigations in 9-12 builds on K-8 experiences and progresses to include investigations that provide evidence for and test conceptual, mathematical, physical, and empirical models.
·  Plan an investigation or test a design individually and collaboratively to produce data to serve as the basis for evidence as part of building and revising models, supporting explanations for phenomena, or testing solutions to problems. Consider possible confounding variables or effects and evaluate the investigation’s design to ensure variables are controlled.
·  Plan and conduct an investigation individually and collaboratively to produce data to serve as the basis for evidence, and in the design: decide on types, how much, and accuracy of data needed to produce reliable measurements and consider limitations on the precision of the data (e.g., number of trials, cost, risk, time), and refine the design accordingly.
·  Plan and conduct an investigation or test a design solution in a safe and ethical manner including considerations of environmental, social, and personal impacts.
·  Select appropriate tools to collect, record, analyze, and evaluate data.
·  Make directional hypotheses that specify what happens to a dependent variable when an independent variable is manipulated.
Obtaining, Evaluating, and Communicating Information Obtaining, evaluating, and communicating information in 9–12 builds on K–8 experiences and progresses to evaluating the validity and reliability of the claims, methods, and designs.
·  Critically read scientific literature adapted for classroom use to determine the central ideas or conclusions and/or to obtain scientific and/or technical information to summarize complex evidence, concepts, processes, or information presented in a text by paraphrasing them in simpler but still accurate terms.
·  Compare, integrate and evaluate sources of information presented in different media or formats (e.g., visually, quantitatively) as well as in words in order to address a scientific question or solve a problem.
·  Gather, read, and evaluate scientific and/or technical information from multiple authoritative sources, assessing the evidence and usefulness of each source.
·  Evaluate the validity and reliability of and/or synthesize multiple claims, methods, and/or designs that appear in scientific and technical texts or media reports, verifying the data when possible.
 
Crosscutting Concepts
Structure and Function The way an object is shaped or structured determines many of its properties and functions.
  ·  The functions and properties of natural and designed objects and systems can be inferred from their overall structure, the way their components are shaped and used, and the molecular substructures of its various materials.
 
Understandings about the Nature of Science
Scientific Investigations Use a Variety of Methods ·  Science investigations use diverse methods and do not always use the same set of procedures to obtain data.
·  Scientific inquiry is characterized by a common set of values that include:  logical thinking, precision, open-mindedness, objectivity, skepticism, replicability of results, and honest and ethical reporting of findings.
·  The discourse practices of science are organized around disciplinary domains that share exemplars for making decisions regarding the values, instruments, methods, models, and evidence to adopt and use.
·  Scientific investigations use a variety of methods, tools, and techniques to revise and produce new knowledge.
Science Addresses Questions About the Natural and Material World. ·  Science knowledge indicates what can happen in natural systems—not what should happen. The latter involves ethics, values, and human decisions about the use of knowledge.
·  Many decisions are not made using science alone, but rely on social and cultural contexts to resolve issues.
     
 
 
Common Core State Standards for High School Mathematics
 
Modeling standards are indicated by the star symbol (*) throughout other conceptual categories.
CCSS: Conceptual Category – Number and Quantity
Quantities ·         *Reason quantitatively and use units to solve problems.
The Complex Number System ·         Represent complex numbers and their operations on the complex plane.
 
CCSS: Conceptual Category – Functions
Linear, Quadratic, and Exponential Models ·         *Construct and compare linear, quadratic, and exponential models and solve problems.
·         *Interpret expressions for functions in terms of the situation they model.
 
CCSS: Conceptual Category – Geometry
Modeling with Geometry ·         *Apply geometric concepts in modeling situations.
 
CCSS: Conceptual Category – Statistics and Probability
Interpreting Categorical and Quantitative Data ·         *Summarize, represent, and interpret data on a single count or measurement variable.
Making Inferences and Justifying Conclusions ·         *Make inferences and justify conclusions from sample surveys, experiments, and observational studies.
Conditional Probability and the Rules of Probability ·         *Understand independence and conditional probability and use them to interpret data.
·         *Use the rules of probability to compute probabilities of compound events in a uniform probability model.
Using Probability to Make Decisions ·         *Calculate expected values and use them to solve problems.
 
 
Common Core State Standards for English Language Arts
 
CCSS: English Language Arts Standards » Science & Technical Subjects » Grade 9-10
Range of Reading and Level of Text Complexity ·  RST.9-10.10By the end of grade 10, read and comprehend science/technical texts in the grades 9-10 text complexity band independently and proficiently.
 
CCSS: English Language Arts Standards » Writing » Grade 9-10
Text Types and Purposes WHST.9-10.2Write informative/explanatory texts, including the narration of historical events, scientific procedures/ experiments, or technical processes.
·  WHST.9-10.2.AIntroduce a topic and organize ideas, concepts, and information to make important connections and distinctions; include formatting (e.g., headings), graphics (e.g., figures, tables), and multimedia when useful to aiding comprehension.
·  WHST.9-10.2.BDevelop the topic with well-chosen, relevant, and sufficient facts, extended definitions, concrete details, quotations, or other information and examples appropriate to the audience's knowledge of the topic.
·  WHST.9-10.2.DUse precise language and domain-specific vocabulary to manage the complexity of the topic and convey a style appropriate to the discipline and context as well as to the expertise of likely readers.
·  WHST.9-10.2.FProvide a concluding statement or section that follows from and supports the information or explanation presented (e.g., articulating implications or the significance of the topic).
Research to Build and Present Knowledge ·  WHST.9-10.9Draw evidence from informational texts to support analysis, reflection, and research.
Range of Writing ·  WHST.9-10.10Write routinely over extended time frames (time for reflection and revision) and shorter time frames (a single sitting or a day or two) for a range of discipline-specific tasks, purposes, and audiences.
     
 
 
Essential Questions
1.    What is respiration?
2.    What is circulation?
3.    How do the respiratory and circulatory systems work together?
4.    What is the difference between external and internal respiration?
5.    How are gases exchanged in the lungs?
6.    What is the concentration of carbon dioxide in air that is exhaled?
7.    What is the path of flow of blood throughout the body?
8.    What is the difference between systemic and pulmonary circulation?
9.    What is the difference between an artery and a vein?
10.  How do arteries and veins connecting with the lungs differ from arteries and veins connecting with other organs?
11.  What is blood pressure?
12.  How do respiration rates, pulse, and blood pressure respond to rest and exercise?
13.  What roles do hormones released by the endocrine system play in the body?
14.  How do the nervous, endocrine, and renal systems relate to other systems and reactions within an animal?
 

 
Key Terms
Alveolus Aorta Adrenal gland
Adrenaline Artery Atrium
Autonomic system Blood pressure Bromthymol blue
Bronchiole Bronchus Capillary
Cardiovascular Cellular respiration Central nervous system
Circulation Diaphragm Diastolic
Diffusion Endocrine Excretion
Exhalation Heart Heart rate
Homeostasis Hormone Inhalation
Kidney Larynx Lung
Nephron January 25-29 date 01/22/2016 author Debbie Barkela category Uncategorized comment Leave a comment

Ag 1-  We will continue to learn about Parliamentary Procedure. Focus will be on learning motions and amendments.

Ag 2-
Lesson 4.3 Breathing, Beating, and Body Controls
Essential Questions
1.    What is respiration?
2.    What is circulation?
3.    How do the respiratory and circulatory systems work together?
4.    What is the difference between external and internal respiration?
5.    How are gases exchanged in the lungs?
6.    What is the concentration of carbon dioxide in air that is exhaled?
7.    What is the path of flow of blood throughout the body?
8.    What is the difference between systemic and pulmonary circulation?
9.    What is the difference between an artery and a vein?
10.  How do arteries and veins connecting with the lungs differ from arteries and veins connecting with other organs?
11.  What is blood pressure?
12.  How do respiration rates, pulse, and blood pressure respond to rest and exercise?
13.  What roles do hormones released by the endocrine system play in the body?
14.  How do the nervous, endocrine, and renal systems relate to other systems and reactions within an animal?
 

 

Key Terms
Alveolus Aorta Adrenal gland
Adrenaline Artery Atrium
Autonomic system Blood pressure Bromthymol blue
Bronchiole Bronchus Capillary
Cardiovascular Cellular respiration Central nervous system
Circulation Diaphragm Diastolic
Diffusion Endocrine Excretion
Exhalation Heart Heart rate
Homeostasis Hormone Inhalation
Kidney Larynx Lung
Nephron Nerve Neuron
Parasympathetic system Pharynx Physiology
Pituitary gland Pulmonary circulation Pulse
Receptor Renal Respiration
Respiration rate Sensory-somatic system Sphygmomanometer
Stethoscope Sympathetic system Systematic circulation
Systolic Thyroid gland Titration
Trachea Urinary system Vena cava
Ventricle    
 
Day-to-Day Plans
Time: 8 days
The teacher will refer to the Teacher Resources section for specific information on teaching this lesson, in particular Lesson 4.3 Teacher Notes, Lesson 4.3 Glossary, Lesson 4.3 Materials, and other support documents.
Day 1:
·         The teacher will present Concepts, Performance Objectives, Essential Questions, and Key Terms in order to provide a lesson overview.
·         The teacher will provide students with a copy of Activity 4.3.1 Show What I Know.
·         Students will work independently to complete Activity 4.3.1 Show What I Know.
·         The teacher will provide students with a copy of Presentation Notes pages to be used throughout the lessons to record notes and reflections.
·         The teacher will present PowerPoint® Respiratory and Circulatory Anatomy.
·         Students will take notes using Presentation Notes pages if needed.
·         Students will correct Activity 4.3.1 Show What I Know and add any parts or functions they are missing.
Day 2:
·         The teacher will provide students with a copy of Activity 4.3.2 Take a Deep Breath.
·         Students will work in groups of four to complete Activity 4.3.2 Take a Deep Breath.
Day 3 – 4:
·         The teacher will provide students with a copy of Project 4.3.3 Cruising With a Blood Cell and Project 4.3.3 Evaluation Rubric.
·         Students will work in pairs to complete Project 4.3.3 Cruising With a Blood Cell.
·         The teacher will assess student work using Project 4.3.3 Evaluation Rubric.
Day 5 – 6:
·         The teacher will provide students with a copy of Activity 4.3.4 Raising the Beat, Lab Report Template, and Lab Report Evaluation Rubric.
·         The teacher will demonstrate the proper procedures for determining respiration rate, pulse, and blood pressure.
·         Students will work in teams of three to complete Part One and begin Part Two of Activity 4.3.4 Raising the Beat.
·         HOMEWORK: Students will independently prepare a lab report on their findings from Activity 4.3.4 Raising the Beat. The lab report will be due in three days.
Day 7 – 8:
·         The teacher will present PowerPoint® Nerves, Hormones, and Kidneys.
·         Students will take notes using the Presentation Notes pages provided.
·         The teacher will provide students with a copy of Project 4.3.5 Mapping Reactions and Project 4.3.5 Evaluation Rubric.
·         Students will work with a partner to complete Project 4.3.5 Mapping Reactions.
·         The teacher will assess student work using Project 4.3.5 Evaluation Rubric.
·         The teacher will distribute Lesson 4.3 Check for Understanding.
·         Students will complete Lesson 4.3 Check for Understanding and submit for grading.
·         The teacher will use Lesson 4.3 Check for Understanding Answer Key to grade student assessments.

Ag 3-
We will be looking at Current issues in Agriculture.

Junior High -  Ag Careers  and their importance

Welding-
Complete safety and tour shop.

Ag Leadership-
Communication styles
 

January 18-22

date 01/15/2016 author Debbie Barkela category Uncategorized comment Leave a comment

Ag 1-
Lesson 3.3 Totally Cellular
Essential Questions
1.    What is a cell?
2.    How are animal and plant cells similar?
3.    What different physical structures do animal and plant cells contain?
4.    What does the nucleus look like in terms of appearance?
5.    What is important about the nucleus of animal and plant cells?
6.    What is DNA?
7.    Why is DNA important for the development of animals and plants?
8.    What are genes?
9.    How are genes associated with DNA?
10. Why is an understanding of genes important for animal and plant production?
 
Key Terms
 

Adenine Cell membrane Cell wall
Cells Centriole Centrosome
Chloroplast Chromosome Cytoplasm
Cytosine Cytoskeleton Cytosol
DNA Eukaryote cell Genes
Golgi apparatus Guanine Inheritance
Lysosome Mitochondria Molecule
Nuclei Nucleolus Nucleotide
Nucleus Organelle Peroxisome
Precipitant Prokaryote Protein synthesis
Ribosome RNA Rough endoplasmic reticulum
Secretory vesicle Smooth endoplasmic reticulum Synthesis
Thymine Traits Vacuole
 
Day-to-Day Plans
Time: 8 days
The teacher will refer to the Teacher Resources section for specific information on teaching this lesson, in particular, Lesson 3.3 Teacher Notes, Lesson 3.3 Glossary, Lesson 3.3 Equipment and Supplies, and other support materials.
Day 1 – 2:
·         The teacher will present Concepts, Performance Objectives, Key Terms, and Essential Questions in order to provide a lesson overview.
·         The teacher will provide students with a copy of Activity 3.3.1 Cell Parts.
·         Students will work in pairs to complete Activity 3.3.1 Cell Parts.
·         The teacher will have students complete the conclusion questions for Activity 3.3.1 Cell Parts and collect activity sheets once completed.
·         The teacher will use Activity 3.3.1 Answer Key for grading.
Day 3:
·         Students will submit their Lab Reports for Activity 3.2.2 Life, Death, and pH.
·         The teacher will assess student work using Lab Report Evaluation Rubric.
·         The teacher will review microscope care found in the AFNR Laboratory Safety Manual and demonstrate proper microscope handling and use to students.
·         The teacher will provide students with a copy of Activity 3.3.2 A Nuclear Onion.
·         Students will work in pairs to demonstrate their skill using a microscope and identify the cell structures in Activity 3.3.2 A Nuclear Onion.
Day 4:
·         The teacher will provide students Activity 3.3.3 Extracting DNA.
·         Students will work in pairs to complete Activity 3.3.3 Extracting DNA.
·         Students will complete conclusion questions for Activity 3.3.3 Extracting DNA.
·         The teacher will lead a class discussion regarding results of Activity 3.3.3 Extracting DNA and correct any misconceptions students have.
Day 5:
·         The teacher will provide students Presentation Notes pages to be used throughout the presentation to record notes and reflections. These pages are to be added to the Agriscience Notebook.
·         The teacher will present PowerPoint® DNA.
·         Students will take notes using the Presentation Notes pages provided by the teacher.
·         The teacher will provide students with a copy of Activity 3.3.4 DNA Models.
·         Students will work in pairs to complete Activity 3.3.4 DNA Models and complete conclusion questions.
Day 6:
·         The teacher will provide students with a copy of Activity 3.3.5 Our Physical Features.
·         The teacher will lead a brainstorming activity to compile a list of physical features according to Part One of Activity 3.3.5 Our Physical Features.
·         Students will complete Activity 3.3.5 Our Physical Features and Conclusion questions.
·         The teacher will provide students Project 3.3.6 Family Traits.
·         HOMEWORK: Students will research information related to their personal family traits for Project 3.3.6 Family Traits.
Day 7:
·         Students will work independently to complete Project 3.3.6 Family Traits and submit for grading.
·         The teacher will assess student work using Project 3.3.6 Evaluation Rubric.
Day 8:
·         The teacher will distribute Lesson 3.3 Check for Understanding.
·         Students will complete Lesson 3.3 Check for Understanding


Ag 2-
Lesson 4.2 Putting the Puzzle Together
Essential Questions
1.    Why are external parts necessary to know?
2.    What common external parts are found on all livestock species?
3.    What is a dissection?
4.    What is an organ?
5.    How are tissues formed in the body of an animal?
6.    What are the different types of tissues in the body of an animal?
7.    What is the body structure of a vertebrate?
8.    What are the purposes of bone besides physical structure?
9.    What is the purpose of tendons?
10.  What is the purpose of ligaments?
11.  How do muscle tissues differ based on their location in the body of an animal?
12.  What is the largest internal organ in the body of an animal?
13.  How do multiple organs work together in the body of an animal?
14.  What is the relationship between external body parts and internal systems?
15.  What are the main functions of the respiratory system?
16.  What organs make up the respiratory system, digestive system, circulatory system, nervous and endocrine system?
17.  What are the main functions of the digestive system?
18.  What are the main functions of the nervous and endocrine systems?
 
Key Terms
 
Anatomy Bone Cardiac
Cartilage Circulation Digestion
Epithelial layer External Hock
Internal Ligament Monogastric
Muscle tissue Organ Physiology
Reproductive system Respiration Ruminant
Tendon Tissue Vertebrate
 
Day-to-Day Plans
Time: 6 days
The teacher will refer to the Teacher Resources section for specific information on teaching this lesson, in particular Lesson 4.2 Teacher Notes, Lesson 4.2 Glossary, Lesson 4.2 Materials, and other support documents.
Day 1:
·         The teacher will present Concepts, Performance Objectives, Essential Questions, and Key Terms in order to provide a lesson overview.
·         The teacher will provide students with a copy of Activity 4.2.1 External Anatomy.
·         Students will work independently to complete Activity 4.2.1 External Anatomy.
·         The teacher will provide students Presentation Notes pages to be used throughout the presentation to record notes and reflections. These pages are to be added to the Agriscience Notebook.
·         The teacher will present PowerPoint® Tissues.
·         Students will take notes using the Presentation Notes pages.
Day 2:
·         The teacher will provide students with a copy of Activity 4.2.2 Just Winging It.
·         Students will work in pairs to complete Activity 4.2.2 Just Winging It.
·         Homework: Students will read pages 112 – 116 of the classroom text Modern Livestock and Poultry Production related to digestive systems.
Day 3:
·         The teacher will provide students with a copy of Activity 4.2.3 Inside Investigation.
·         Students will access the Virtual Pig Dissection website at http://www.whitman.edu/biology/vpd/main.html and review the Study Guide for Anatomical References and Digestive System as instructed in Activity 4.2.3 Inside Investigation.
·         Students will work in pairs to complete Part One of Activity 4.2.3 Inside Investigation.
·         The teacher will carefully observe students while monitoring correct procedures and safety.
·         The teacher will ask students to identify parts of the digestive system to verify they have completed Part One of Activity 4.2.3 Inside Investigation.
Day 4:
·         Students will access the Virtual Pig Dissection website at http://www.whitman.edu/biology/vpd/main.html and review the Study Guide for Circulatory System and Respiratory System as instructed in Activity 4.2.3 Inside Investigation.
·         Students will work in pairs to complete Part Two of Activity 4.2.3 Inside Investigation.
·         The teacher will carefully observe students while monitoring correct procedures and safety.
·         The teacher will ask students to identify parts of the circulatory and respiratory systems to verify they have completed Part Two of Activity 4.2.3 Inside Investigation.
Day 5:
·         Students will access the Virtual Pig Dissection website at http://www.whitman.edu/biology/vpd/main.html and review the Study Guide for Excretory System, Sexing Your Pig, Reproductive System, and Nervous System as instructed in Activity 4.2.3 Inside Investigation.
·         Students will work in pairs to complete Part Three of Activity 4.2.3 Inside Investigation.
·         The teacher will carefully observe students while monitoring correct procedures and safety.
·         The teacher will ask students to identify parts of the excretory, reproductive, and nervous system to verify they have completed Part Three of Activity 4.2.3 Inside Investigation.
Day 6:
·         The teacher will distribute Lesson 4.2 Check for Understanding


Ag 3-
This week we will be focused on getting everyone caught up with their own personal records.

Horticulture
This week we will be looking at Unit 1- Exploring The Horticulture Field

Welding 1 & 2
Expectations and safety

Jr. High
Expectations and the we will be looking at what is Agriculture????
 

January 4-15

date 01/08/2016 author Debbie Barkela category Uncategorized comment Leave a comment

All Classes preparing for finals.

 

December 7-11

date 12/04/2015 author Debbie Barkela category Uncategorized comment Leave a comment

Ag 1-
Monday - Activity 3.2.2 Life, Death, and pH- Lab
Tuesday- Finish Lab report
Wednesday- Essential Questions
Thursday- Check For Understanding
Friday- Start Lesson 3.3 – Totally Cellular

Ag 2-
Monday- Activity 4.1.2 Examining Cell Structure.

·         Students will work in pairs to complete Activity 4.1.2 Examining Cell Structure.

Tuesday

·         The teacher will present PowerPoint® Cell Respiration.

·          Activity 4.1.3 Cellular Respiration Study

Wednesday-

·         Students will work in pairs to complete Activity 4.1.3 Cellular Respiration Study.

Thursday- Activity 4.1.4 Moving Molecules.

Friday- Activity 4.1.5 Just Passing Through

·         Students will work in pairs to complete Step 1 of Part One in Activity 4.1.5 Just Passing Through.

Monday

·         Students will complete Activity 4.1.5 Just Passing Through.


Tuesday- Lesson 4.1 Check for Understanding.

Ag 3
Students will be checking their Commodity Challenge progress daily as well as completing some record keeping

Welding-
Students will be working in the shop

Animal Science-
Monday- Tuesday Review for Exam
Wednesday - Exam
Thursday we will begin the genetics unit.  We will have our Final Exam for this class on Thursday December 17.
Junior High
We will begin looking at how our favorite food get to our plate in the FARM to FORK Unit.